HW#3 - Reading Assignment 3rd Week In W.C. Salmon's take on...

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Reading Assignment 3 rd Week In W.C. Salmon's take on the Problem of Induction, he concentrates his responses on the idea of knowledge and reality. With his foremost introduction of David Hume's Problem of Induction, he first defines the question itself in a more philosophical way. He mentions that even though our senses possess a very limited scope and capacity to reach knowledge of anything from before birth or of any future events, we still have this belief that we have indirect knowledge of such facts. Salmon's biggest concern, however, is not necessarily of Hume's question, "How do we acquire knowledge of the unobserved?" but it is whether these so-called beliefs actually constitute knowledge in any way. In Salmon’s view, Hume’s question breaks down into two separate dilemmas. First, since inductive justifications presuppose that some other inductions are justified, there can be no such thing as inductive justification of induction. Second, while deductive inferences are nonampliative, inductive inferences are ampliative. Therefore,
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2008 for the course PHIL 262g taught by Professor Yaffe during the Spring '06 term at USC.

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HW#3 - Reading Assignment 3rd Week In W.C. Salmon's take on...

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