US history final - Erie Canal Proposed in 1808 and...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 11 pages.

Erie Canal Proposed in 1808 and completed in 1825, this canal combined the waters of Lake Erie in the west to the Hudson River in the east. This canal was built to open the country west of the Appalachian Mountains to settlers and to offer a cheap and safe way to carry produce to a market. This was a time when bulk goods were limited to pack animals, and there were no railways so the water was the most cost-efficient way to ship these goods in bulk. This was also the first transportation system between the eastern seaboard and the western interior of the United states that did not require portage. Samuel F. B. Morse Was an American Painter and inventor who contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He received a patent for the telegraph in 1847, forever changing the ease of communicating to people from a far. This invention was very helpful when discussing communication during warfare because it allowed U.S. officials to send and receive messages from across the nation. Transcendentalism An American literary, political, and philosophical movement of the early nineteenth century, centered around the Ralph Waldo Emerson. The movement was a reaction to or protest against the general state of intellectualism and spirituality. A core belief was in the inherent goodness of both people and nature. Believed that society and its institutions ultimately corrupted the purity of the individual. Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments Under the leadership of Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a convention for the rights of women was held in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. It was attended by between 200 and 300
people, both women and men. Out of that first convention came a historic document, the "Declaration of Sentiments," which demanded equal social status and legal rights for women including the right to vote. This was the first women's rights movement in the United States. Second Great Awakening Was a protestant religious revival movement during the early 19th century in the United States. The Movement began around 1790, gained momentum by 1800 and, after 1820, membership rose rapidly among Baptist and Methodist congregations whose preachers lead the movement. This movement reflected Romanticism characterized by enthusiasm, emotion, and an appeal to the super-natural. The revivals enrolled millions of new members in existing evangelical denominations and led to the formation of new denominations. Many converts believed that the Awakening heralded a new millennial age. Temperance Movement Is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages. This movement typically criticized the excessive alcohol consumption, promote complete abstinence, or use its political influence to press the government to enact alcohol laws to regulate the availability of alcohol. It prohibited the buying, selling or producing of alcohol, however it was not illegal to posses if one already did.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture