APBiology- Systems test review

APBiology- Systems test review - NONSPECIFIC DEFENSES: The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
NONSPECIFIC DEFENSES: The first 2 lines of defense in the immune system are nonspecific. One type of nonspecific defense is the skin, which acts as a protective cover or barrier to keep pathogens out of the body. Another type of nonspecific defense of the body is antimicrobial proteins, such as lysozymes, that breaks down the cell walls of pathogens to render them ineffective. An example of a lysozyme would be tears or saliva. Another defense would be hair or cilia that lines the lungs, nasal cavities, and other openings to sweep out and trap pathogens out of the body. SPECIFIC DEFENSES: This process is known as the third line of defense, and is specific. Starts off with a bacteria or virus carrying antigens on the outer body of the virus/bacteria. These antigens are foreign and the body must rid of them. Macrophages will engulf these antigens by the process of phagocytosis. Once inside the macrophage, the antigens will leave the virus/bacteria and move towards the outer part of the macrophage. It will combine w/
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/27/2008 for the course BIOL 1110 taught by Professor Mclain during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Southern University .

Page1 / 3

APBiology- Systems test review - NONSPECIFIC DEFENSES: The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online