module 7 objectives - evaluate President Johnsons domestic...

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evaluate President Johnson’s domestic policy-Johnson expanded U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War during the 1960s. At the same time, he also pursued domestic policies and programs to help create a Great Society. History usually remembers "LBJ" more for his role in Vietnam, though his expansion of social programs on the home front impacts Americans to this day.-In 1964, President Johnson pushed for Kennedy's reforms and campaigned for the presidential election. He shared his vision for the United States, the Great Society, in a speech to university students in Michigan. Johnson described a future where the federal government would work with local governmentsand leaders to end poverty and ensure equal rights for all Americans.-President Johnson's goals of ending poverty and injustice were just the first steps toward creating the Great Society. Once these issues were corrected, the country would become a place where people connected with nature and protected the environment. Americans would work together to improve communities and focus on the quality of life.-In the summer of 1964 Johnson declared "war on poverty in America" and signed his Economic Opportunity Act. The act created several programs aimed at education and employment. Johnson's campaign speeches promised greater changes to come if he was elected president. It was a very liberal vision, one that saw the federal government as responsible for securing and improving Americans' well-being.-President Johnson was most active in domestic policy between the years 1964–1966. His agenda was the largest set of social welfare programs since Roosevelt's New Deal.-President Johnson, or LBJ, saw the Great Society as fulfilling goals unmet in the years since the New Deal. He had the same focus on experimentation and basic security, yet went further. LBJ believed the New Deal did not properly address the root causes of poverty, including education access and racial inequality. The Great Society expanded on New Deal programs that still operated and created new programs that exist to the present day. Several of his programs addressed education and employment, two key factors in alleviating poverty.-1964 Tax Reduction Act Taxes on corporations and wealthy people are cut by 10 billion dollars, a proposal begun by President Kennedy. The purpose is to encourage businesses to increase employment and production. Some historians credit the policy with driving down unemployment, decreasing the federal debt, and increasing consumer spending.-1964 Civil Rights Act The 1964 Civil Rights Act banned discrimination in access to public facilities, employment, and federal programs. It outlawed discrimination based on race, religion, gender, and national origin. It gave the federal government the power to enforce school desegregation, which had proceeded slowly since the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision that stated segregation in schools was unconstitutional. In 1968, another Civil Rights Act was passed to prevent

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