lect19 - Biology 427 Bimechanics 2007 Lift and circulation...

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Biology 427 Bimechanics 2007 Lift and circulation •Recap drag, shape, and the Reynolds number •Return to lift and Bernoulli •Basic definitions of wing shape •The relationship between lift and circulation •Mechanisms that promote or maintain circulation. •The challenge of flapping flight Log Reynolds number C d streamlined body: same surface area -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 roughness and “turbulators” 100 10 1 0.1 D = 0.5 C d r S u 2 Log Reynolds number C d streamlined body: same surface area -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 roughness 100 10 1 0.1 Other factors: temperature? compliance? mucus (polymers)? flapping? D = 0.5 C d r S u 2 D = 0.5 C d ! S u 2 weight = mg drag a terminal situation at equilibrium mg = 0.5 C d ! S u 2 + V ! g V ! c g = 0.5 C d ! S u 2 + V ! g 4 ! r 3 ! c g/3 = 0.5 C d ! ! r 2 u 2 + 4 ! r 3 ! g/3 4r ( ! c - ! )g/3 = 0.5 C d ! u 2 buoyancy
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Fluid Dynamic Power = D u = 0.5 C d ! S u 3 Consequences to porpoising? Drag is a mechanism by which swimming forces arise Fluid Dynamic Power = D u = 0.5 C d ! S u 3 Consequences to porpoising?
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2008 for the course BIOL 427 taught by Professor Daniels during the Spring '08 term at University of Washington.

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lect19 - Biology 427 Bimechanics 2007 Lift and circulation...

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