ch 09 notes - We the People, Sixth edition Chapter 9....

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We the People, Sixth edition by Benjamin Ginsberg, Theodore J. Lowi, and Margaret Weir Chapter 9. Political Parties
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What Are Political Parties? political parties: organized groups that attempt to influence the government by electing their members to important government offices Political Parties Are Outgrowths of the Electoral Process. ± For every district level where an election is held, there is a party unit. ± The nature of the American electoral system encourages the two-party system.
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America’s single-member plurality (SMP) electoral system tends to dilute the impact of individual votes in specific geographic areas and encourage voters to support one of two major parties.
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Parties Are Outgrowths of the Policy-making Process. ± Parties are coalitions of individuals with shared or overlapping interest and policy goals. ± When they are strong, parties can provide ready-made majorities for policy passage.
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The Two-Party System in America America has a stable two-party system that first emerged in the late 18 th century as a conflict between Federalists led by Alexander Hamilton and Republicans led by Thomas Jefferson.
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Democrats The modern Democratic Party emerged out of the Republican party established by Thomas Jefferson in the late 18 th century and revitalized by Andrew Jackson in the 1820s. Republicans The modern Republican Party emerged in the 1850s as an antislavery party and out of the remnants of the Whig Party.
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Electoral Realignments electoral realignments: the point in history when a new party supplants the ruling party, becoming in turn the dominant political force Realignments tend to involve: ± A large number of voters changing their party allegiance ± A great deal of voter participation in an election ± A stable change in the party controlling the government
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2008 for the course AM GOVT 1301 taught by Professor Benton during the Spring '08 term at Lamar University.

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ch 09 notes - We the People, Sixth edition Chapter 9....

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