Poly Sci Chap 11 - The Logic of Elections American...

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The Logic of Elections American democracy is representative democracy. Delegation of authority raises the possibility of agency loss. How do elections work to alleviate this problem?
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The Right to Vote Only about half of the free adult male population was eligible to vote at the time the Constitution was adopted. The initial property requirements for voting in early American history were a reflection of social reality at the time. Those in an advantaged position were not inclined to risk the social order, which helped them maintain their position. The Revolutionary War changed things
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Suffrage for Women The women’s suffrage movement grew directly out of the antislavery movement. Suffragists felt betrayed by the Civil War amendments – why? The resistance to women’s suffrage was gradually overcome by a combination of social change. The Nineteenth Amendment, adopted in 1920, finally guaranteed women everywhere the right to vote.
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Suffrage for African Americans, Young Americans When did we finally have universal suffrage for African Americans? The most recent expansion of voting rights, the Twenty-sixth Amendment (1971). This was also a political move. What motivated it?
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Who Uses the Right to Vote? Most of us agree that the right to vote is the very essence of democracy. Yet millions of Americans do not vote. Is this irrational? Why? Why not?
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Who Uses the Right to Vote? The share of eligible voters who go to the polls has varied widely over American history. The most important contemporary change was the sharp decline in voter turnout between 1960 and 1972.
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Individual Factors Affecting Turnout Education Age Blacks and Hispanics Men v. women People with deeper roots in their communities Individuals with greater internal efficacy Cynical and distrusting people Strong partisans
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