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Critique12017 - On February 1 at 7:30 pm in Williams Hall I...

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On February 1 at 7:30 pm in Williams Hall, I attended the talk entitled “Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America” by Michael Z. Newman author of the just- published book of the same title, and professor at the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee. Newman’s talk focused on the emergence of video-games in the U.S. from early hits like pong game to popular classics like Pac-Man, explaining video-games in relation to other types of technologies and forms of amusement, all the while arguing how the identity of video-games in the U.S. can be seen as youthful, masculine and for the middle class. Newman discussed how the coming of video-games had conflicting identities when they were first released. For instance, it was unclear whether video-games would be played publicly in an arcade or privately at home, which age group, gender they would be targeted to, and whether or not they would appeal to a form of mass culture or an upscale culture associated with people of different class identities. Nonetheless, one
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