PL SC Chp1 - The Logic of American Politics Chapter One The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Logic of American Politics Chapter One
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Logic of American Politics Choices are at the heart of American politics. Politics arises from the need to choose among alternatives when differences make it impossible for all people to get what they want. Thus choices breed conflict. Why? Conflicting interests. Conflicting values. Conflicting ideas about how to allocate limited resources.
Background image of page 2
The Logic of American Politics Politics is how people attempt to manage such conflict. What happens when politics fails? More formally, politics is the process through which individuals and groups reach agreement on a course of common or collective action -- even as they continue to disagree on the goals that action is intended to achieve .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Logic of American Politics Successful politics almost always requires bargaining and compromise. Bargaining : prolonged exchange of proposals and counterproposals. Compromise : settlement in which each side concedes some of its preferences in order to secure others. Preferences are the “givens” -- individuals and groups know what they want -- that must be reconciled.
Background image of page 4
The Logic of American Politics The more people involved in the political process, and as issues become more complex and divisive, unstructured negotiation generally fails. One reason: fear of reneging may foster mutual suspicions and belief that “politics” won’t work. So what is required? Effective political institutions. Set of rules and procedures for negotiations. The Constitution
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Constitutions and Governments Nations can be thought of as organizations. Most organizations require some form of rules or procedures -- a constitution, by-laws, a charter … different names, but similar purpose: To guide an organization’s members in making essentially political decisions. Political decisions are those in which the participants initially disagree about what they would like the organization to do.
Background image of page 6
Constitutions and Governments But nations have more difficulty as organizations required to make political decisions. Why? Larger number of participants. Issues may be complex. Monitoring and enforcing agreements made by participants may be difficult.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Constitutions and Governments Degree of success depends largely on whether they have developed constitutions and governments that work. A constitution of a nation establishes its governing institutions and the set of rules and procedures these institutions must (and must not) follow to reach and enforce collective agreements.
Background image of page 8
A government consists of those institutions and the legally prescribed process for making and enforcing collective agreements. Assumes various forms: monarchy,
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/17/2008 for the course PL SC 001 taught by Professor Gold,suzannemcampbell,thomasc during the Fall '07 term at Penn State.

Page1 / 39

PL SC Chp1 - The Logic of American Politics Chapter One The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online