GRADEDkristyknowlesessay1 - World War II Propaganda I World...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
World War II Propaganda I World War II Propaganda: Exploring Deeper Meanings Kristine Knowles ENGL 202A, Section 3 Professor Hirt February 13, 2008
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
World War II Propaganda 2 World War II Propaganda: Exploring Deeper Meanings Introduction America has changed tremendously since World War II. It is hard to even make a comparison to America’s military climate during World War II to the one now. People knew the true meaning of sacrifice during World War II and were truly active in war efforts, donating time, energy, and money. During World War II, a large percentage of Americans strongly supported the U.S. military efforts abroad and were often willing to make significant personal sacrifices to aid the war effort. In contrast, most Americans today do not have the same sense that their daily lives are personally impacted by the United States’ war effort in Iraq. In 2008, we do not find ourselves buying war bonds or sacrificing valuable domestic resources due to the military action abroad. During World War II, nearly everyone was involved in war efforts and each contribution helped the war efforts. According to the book No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II , Roosevelt claimed “that the efforts of those civilians at home supporting the war through personal sacrifice was just as crucial to winning the war, as the efforts of the soldiers themselves” (Goodwin, 1995, pp 92). Military recruitment during World War II was drastically different than it is now. Prior to World War II, the U.S. government passed the Selective Training and Service Act, which allowed the government to draft American men into mandatory military service. Conscription during World War II was carried out by
Background image of page 2
World War II Propaganda 3 local draft boards composed of community leaders who had to meet a certain quota and fill them appropriately. There was a relatively low level of resistance to mandatory conscription during World War II. The draft during WWII made the entire male civilian population over the age of 18 potentially subject to military service, thus creating close ties between the military and civilian segments of society. Our military now operates in a very different fashion. We now are not called to duty through a draft, but are given the choice of military service as an option for a career. The military offers many rewards for those participants interested in joining the military. Today, individuals join the Armed Forces for the numerous perks, including educational benefits and job security. Since the draft was discontinued in 1973, the United States military has been composed entirely of volunteers to military service, which may in some sense have led to a greater disconnect between the military population and the civilian population today than what existed during World War II. World War II was certainly a war of intense sacrifice and hardship.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/17/2008 for the course ENGL 202A taught by Professor Hirtjenniferlee during the Spring '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

Page1 / 17

GRADEDkristyknowlesessay1 - World War II Propaganda I World...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online