Tiffany Beverly essay3 americanlit - Tiffany Beverly Helen...

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Tiffany Beverly Helen Driver LITR221 D004 Win17 April 30, 2017 Supportive Housing is “Somewhere for Everyone.” “For a brief period, back in the ‘80’s, homelessness was the chic issue of the pretty people. It was worthy of galas and fund-raisers and cover stories” (Grisham). John Grisham didn’t realize the extent of the homeless problem in the United States, until he ventured to New York City. He is from a small town where it was not talked about. There is a large misconception about the homeless population, most people think they are just drug addicts, and alcoholics. In the large city of New York, as well as so many other cities in the U.S. the homeless population is made up of mentally ill people, women, children, and veterans; but mostly those that have been cycled through the Criminal justice system for one reason or another (Semuels). Supportive housing could change the homeless population permanently. Changing the homeless population in the United States, would allow people to see those that are chronically homeless for the human beings they really are. Until a person is either educated on the state of the homeless population, or they are subjected to the lifestyle, it is assumed that homeless people are lazy, begging, addicts and drunks. Grisham tells his readers that in his essay “Somewhere for Everyone.” When faced with a homeless man, Grisham is scared, he is ill educated; what he encounters is an angry panhandler who is not going to be ignored. Grisham describes the man as “being left to torment someone else,” (Grisham), when he can blend in with the crowd, and get away from him. If these people
could work, and not have to prepare for the next battle, they would be able to be a positive part of society. Women, and children, are often homeless living in shelters, in parks, alleyways, stairwells, anywhere they can be out of the elements. These people are often victims of abuse, and rape, just trying to survive. They feel as though they have no support system. These mothers are scared to death that if someone tried to help them, they will take their children. The mentally ill fear help for much of the same reason, they feel they can’t trust anyone. They fear the system, being thrown in jail, locked in a mental hospital, abused, they don’t believe there is a support system to help them.

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