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MMW 4 8.19.08

MMW 4 8.19.08 - span.SPELLE{mso-spl-e:yes MMW 4 New Ideas...

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span.SPELLE {mso-spl-e:yes;} MMW 4 New Ideas and the Clash of Cultures Prof. Patrick Patterson Europe Reborn, Europe Divided (Again): The Renaissance and the Reformation Reader: Petrus Paulus Vergerius. "On the New Education" (c. 1400) Georgio Vasari, "Life of Leonardo da Vinci" (1550) Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince (1513), selections Martin Luther, "On Christian Liberty" and "On Secular Authority" Announcements and Reminders Overview of today's presentation Introduction: Just what is it that makes the Renaissance so different, so appealing? Part One -- Europe Reborn: The Renaissance I. What was the Renaissance? II. How new and different was the Renaissance? -- the lessons of the long view III. What difference did the Renaissance make? Part Two -- Europe Divided (Again): The Protestant Reformation I. The causes of the Reformation II. The nature of the Reformation III. The lasting significance of the Reformation -------------------------- Detailed outline for today's presentation Part One -- Europe Reborn: The Renaissance I. What was the Renaissance? A. Towards a working definition of "the Renaissance" Periodization: roughly last half of the 1300s to middle of the 1600s Location: origins in Italy, spread to the north
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Scope: art, literature, science, education; but spillover into government and the broader culture A key characteristic: recovery and use of the classical past B. The sources and causes of the Renaissance Earlier medieval traditions of learning and scholarship Humanism Fertile cultural and political milieu of Italian states and city-states (Burckhardt) European mercantile wealth: Italy, the Low Countries -- an interesting correspondence C. Where to find the Renaissance: what to look for in the primary sources you encounter -- the classical AND the religious AND the secular, but above all the NATURAL and the HUMAN E.g., the development of perspective: the work of Leo Battista Alberti (1404-1472) Image: representation of depth in Chinese art Image: representative Byzantine art -- Italian mosaic Image: perspective system Image: Renaissance use of perspective II. How new and different was it? -- the lessons of the long view A. A debate: some see the Renaissance as a real break, some stress continuities Jacob Burckhardt: the birth of the modern -- Italians as the "firstborn among the sons of modern Europe" VS. some later interpretations: "there is no there there" (or not nearly as much there there as we used to think) -The world that 19 th century Europeans live in – that world is modern – something about it is distinct from everything else before -Italian is the first “modern” -Makes the claim that before the renaissance – Europe was not modern - B. Case in point: the departure from scholasticism -Empiricism – using evidence to make a decision – scientific method -A move away from rules derived from books, but rules derived from reason basis in Greek and Latin classical traditions (e.g., and especially, Aristotle)
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