Study Guide Exam 3 NTR 311

Study Guide Exam 3 NTR 311 - Tammie Tse NTR 311 - Staskel 1...

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Tammie Tse NTR 311 - Staskel 1 NTR 311 Study Guide - Exam 3 Chapters 10-14 The 4 components of fitness are: cardiorespiratory endurance flexibility muscle endurance muscle strength List the benefits of fitness (as discussed in class): restful sleep nutritional health optimal body composition optimal bone density resistance to colds and other infectious diseases low risks of some types of cancer strong circulation and lung function low incidence and severity of anxiety and depression low risk of cardiovascular disease low risk of type 2 diabetes reduced risk of gallbladder disease in women The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans state that people need to participate in 30 minutes of physical activity most days of the week for health benefits and 60 minutes to maintain a healthy body weight. Guidelines for conditioning Cardiorespiratory Endurance o Frequency: 3 – 5 days a week o Intensity: 55 – 90% maximum heart rate o Duration: 20 – 60 minutes Flexibility o Frequency: 2 – 3 days a week o Intensity: enough to develop and maintain full range of motion o Duration: 4 repetitions of 10 – 30 seconds per muscle group Muscle Endurance Muscle Strength o Frequency: 2 – 3 days a week o Intensity: enough to enhance muscle strength, muscle endurance, and improve body composition o Duration: 8 – 12 repetitions of 8 – 10 different exercises Overload principle (aka progressive overload) – to slightly increase comfortable capacity in each area o Increased frequency – how often an activity is performed o Increased intensity – degree of exertion while exercising o Increased duration – length of time Body’s response to physical activity o Hypertrophy is muscle gain in size and strength, the result of repeated work o Atrophy is muscle loss in size and strength, result of lack of activity Very highly intense activity, lasting 20 seconds to 3 minutes uses ATP from carbohydrates (lactic acid) for energy (anaerobic) Highly intense activity lasting 3-20 minutes uses ATP from carbohydrates for energy (aerobic) Moderately intense activity lasting more than 20 minutes uses ATP from fat for energy (aerobic) ex. hiking
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Tammie Tse NTR 311 - Staskel 2 First 20 minutes of Activity – primarily uses glycogen for energy After 20 minutes of Activity – uses glycogen and fat for energy The better trained the muscles, the more fat is used for energy Nutrient Recommendations o Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) – a set of nutrient intake values for healthy people in the US and Canada. These values are used for planning and assessing diets and include: Estimated Average Requirements (EAR) Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) Adequate Intakes (AI) Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL) o Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) – the average daily amount of a nutrient considered adequate to meet the known nutrient needs of practically all healthy people; a goal for dietary intake by individuals
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This note was uploaded on 09/01/2008 for the course NTR 311 taught by Professor Lydiasteinman during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Study Guide Exam 3 NTR 311 - Tammie Tse NTR 311 - Staskel 1...

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