Young Goodman Brown

Young Goodman Brown - The Allegory of Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthornes piece Young Goodman Brown contrasts the nave youthful impressions of

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Allegory of Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne’s piece, “Young Goodman Brown,” contrasts the naïve youthful impressions of morality with the realistic views of matured individuals. Through vivid word choice, as well as his extensive use of symbolism, Hawthorne engenders an allegorical tone which imparts the idea that through introspective evaluation, maturity is reached while the ideal of innocence is abandoned. Hawthorne’s effective word choice is present from the beginning, even within the title. The word “Young” conveys a feeling of innocence, while “Goodman” or “Good-man” connotes a virtuous everyman character with whom the reader can associate. Thus, it is imparted a youthful state can be correlated with a good and innocent status. This idea is supported by the recurring vision of the colorful pink ribbons of Goodman’s young wife, Faith. As they dance in the wind, these bright ribbons represent the vibrancy of youth. Initially, this nature matches that of the pious and naïve Goodman Brown. However, as the story progresses, and his attitude
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/01/2008 for the course HHS 125 taught by Professor Mako during the Fall '08 term at Stevens.

Page1 / 2

Young Goodman Brown - The Allegory of Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthornes piece Young Goodman Brown contrasts the nave youthful impressions of

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online