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Lecture 25 Flagella and Cilia - BME 418 Quantitative Cell...

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BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Alan J. Hunt Lecture #25: Flagella and Cilia Previously we discussed bacterial flagella. Bacteria are propelled by a small rotating motor embedded in the bacterial membrane, which turns a long helical flagella. Although the mechanism underlying rotation of the flagellar motor are not worked out, on the surface this seems a very simple solution to motility; a minimalist solution by a minimalist organism. This constrasts with the much larger and more complex eukaryotic flagella, seen here on Chlamydomonas : - Larger than bacterial flagella: d= 0.25 um vs. 10-20 nm, l=10-200 um vs. a few um. - Many components in stead of one (just flagellin in bacteria) - Planar waves instead of helical. - Exhibit more than one kind of motion (Chlamy. swimming for example) - Basal bodies at attachment site, similar to centrioles, serve dual role in Chlamy.
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BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Alan J. Hunt Paramecium: - Cilia and gullet.
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