14 Intermediate Filaments

14 Intermediate Filaments - BME 418 Quantitative Cell...

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BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Alan J. Hunt #14: INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS A. Introduction 1. In contrast to microtubules and microfilaments, intermediate filaments (IFs) exhibit much greater variation in amino acid composition from tissue to tissue. 2. In general, IFs confer mechanical strength on tissues, i.e. resist mechanical stress. Extreme examples are hair and claws, which are remnants of cells that are largely filled in with IFs. 3. Six major classes. *NF is abbreviation for "neurofiliment". B. Structure 1. All IF proteins are fibrous rather than globular. 1
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BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Alan J. Hunt 2. All IF proteins have a homologous (in size, secondary structure, and to some extent in sequence) central rodlike domain, flanked by the N- and C- terminal domains that are non-helical, and differ greatly in size, sequence, and function. The central core domain contains three or four nonhelical "spacer" elements. C.
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14 Intermediate Filaments - BME 418 Quantitative Cell...

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