Community Service Chapter One Introduction to Social Welfare - Community Service Chapter One Introduction to Social Welfare I The Reaction of Others A

Community Service Chapter One Introduction to Social...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 12 pages.

Community Service Chapter One Introduction to Social Welfare I. The Reaction of Others A. Whether based on personal experiences or value orientation, people often possess strong opinions concerning expenditures for social welfare programs II. Aspiring for an enlightened view A. Place yourself in the "role of the other"—someone experiencing difficulties or having limited resources and in need of help or assistance B. As an aspiring social worker, or someone just interested in human services, the ability to entertain social conditions and life circumstances from multiple vantage points is critical. 1. Approach the topic of social welfare with a sense of inquiry, skepticism toward commonly held beliefs, and respect for the social realities of others 2. Push yourself to question the obvious, what people call "common sense," and seek a broaer understanding of what constitutes human need and social welfare. III. Conceptualization of social welfare programs A. Social Welfare programs usually refer to systematic efforts aimed at addressing human needs and providing opportunities (social, economic, education, health, and otherwise) thorugh the provision of some form of aid, assistance, and/ or service 1. Mistakenly, "Social welfare programs are often seen as programs for the poor, but there are many social services that people may need regardless of their income and social status." B. While many people continue to think of social welfare in terms of services addressing basic family support (e.g., monetary assistance to needy families, food stamps, unemployment insurance, subsidized housing, and medical needs), other types of social welfare exist to serve the middle and upper classes. 1. These programs include a federal fiscal welfare system (e.g. tax deductions for dependents, medical expenses, childcare, and college expenses) and occupational welfare programs (e.g., company- based bonus systems, employer provided health care benefits, reimbursement for moving costs, and tuition reimbursement). 2. Interestingly, it appears that "social welfare programs serving the middle and upper classes receive more government funding and face fewer budget cuts than programs serving only poor people IV. Corporate Welfare A. It is also important to note that the United States is heavily engaged in corporate welfare programs— government subsidies, benefits and/or tax breaks for companies and corporate officials 1. Large companies are formidable lobbying entities 2. They invest heavily in efforts (e.g., through political support and contributions) to secure and sustain governmental backing for their specific interests.
Image of page 1
3. Corporate welfare comes in many different forms, including tax abatements, various forms of tax write-offs, subsidized loans, the creation of tax free zones, and special subsidies 4. When companies and corporations struggle to make-ends-meet, for whatever reasons, they often turn to the government for help.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture