Quizz - Quiz 5 Review Chapter 29 Plan ahead to respond...

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Quiz 5ReviewChapter 29Plan ahead to respondeffectively – Keep in mind the importance of the question-and-answer period throughout the speech, anticipate audience questions that may arise from each of your points.Answer questions directly – Always include a one-sentence, direct answer in response to the question. Manage process – Call on questioners in the order they sought recognition, and maintain eye contact while the question is being asked. It is acceptable to limit individuals to one question andone request, and that the question be asked in a simple, and straightforward way. Manage people – Be prepared to keep control of the people asking questions as well as the process by dealing in a firm and tactful manner with several types of distracting questioners.The person who wants to give a speech – The person may agree or disagree with you, or may have a favorite ax to grind that is only tangentially related to your topic. It soon becomes obviousthat this person has no real question to ask you but rather is taking advantage of an assembled audience to rant. The person who wants to have and extended dialogue – This person might start out with a genuine question, but refuse to relinquish the floor when you respond. Rather, he or she encounters with follow-up questions comments on your answers, or opens new lines of discussion. Sometimes, this sort of person wants free professional advice or therapy and does notmind seeking it in public. The person who want to pick a fight – Intellectual confrontation and probing, penetrating questions are to be expected, and even welcomed, from audience members who disagree with you. But sometimes, questioners have become inappropriately argumentative and mount hostile, personal attacks against a speaker. Chapter 30Consider the context – You’ll save time and work more efficiently if you think carefully about the overall context of your speech before you even begin to plan it. You can do this by starting with some fundamental questions. Who, where, what, when, why, and how? Identify formats associated with speaking context – When one conducts a training workshop, orparticipates in a debate, there are some well-known, albeit general, expectations about the shape that speech will take. In other cases, there are more specific formats speakers typically follow. Examples of workplace, civic, and ceremonial formats. When such standard formats exist, it is your responsibility to learn about them and to adhere to them. Analyze the dimensions of the speaking situation – In addition to finding out the essential information about a speech situation and researching existing formats, speakers benefit by thinking about the factors that define every context for speaking. Contexts can be public or private Context is established in part by the venue or domain in whichspeaking occurs. One set of expectations accompanies a meeting in a legislative hall, a large city square, or a cathedral.
Contexts can be formal or informal

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