Chapter 5 - Chapter 5 Enzyme catalyzed reactions are...

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Chapter 5 Enzyme catalyzed reactions are typically 10^3 to 10^20 times faster than the corresponding uncatalyzed reactions. A catalyst may be temporarily changed during the reaction, but it is unchanged in the overall process since it recycles to participate in multiple reactions. Reactants bind to a catalyst, and products dissociate from it. A catalyst does not change the position of the reaction’s equilibrium. Rather, it lowers the amount of energy needed in order for the reaction to proceed. Enzymes are highly specific for the reactants, or substrates, they act on, and the degree of substrate specificity varies. Many enzymes exhibit stereospecificity, meaning that they act on only a single stereoisomer of the substrate. Reaction specificity is the lack of formation of wasteful by-products. Enzymes couple two reactions that would normally occur separately. This property allows the energy gained from one reaction to be used in a second reaction. Coupled reactions.
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2008 for the course BCMB 3100 taught by Professor Mendicino during the Spring '07 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Chapter 5 - Chapter 5 Enzyme catalyzed reactions are...

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