Lecture 7 - Superpos. Waves (14.1-14.2)

Lecture 7 - Superpos. Waves (14.1-14.2) - Lecture 7...

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Lecture 7 Superposition and Standing Waves Ch 14
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The Principle of Superposition o When two (or more) waves overlap each other, the resulting displacement (disturbance) is the sum of the displacements of the individual waves y(x,t) = y 1 (x,t) + y 2 (x,t) o After “interfering” the two o waves each continue, as if nothing had happened
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Consider the superposition of two sinusoidal waves moving to the right with the same frequency along the SAME STRING: Total: Use: A Constant that depends on the difference in phase Result is a sinusoidal wave, traveling to the right but with a different amplitude that depends on the phase difference.
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Consider the superposition of two sinusoidal waves moving to the right with the same frequency along the SAME STRING: Total: A Constant that depends on the difference in phase Result is a sinusoidal wave, traveling to the right but with a different amplitude that depends on the phase difference.
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Consider the superposition of two sinusoidal waves moving to the right with the same frequency along the SAME STRING:
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Wavelength shift and phase difference o It is often useful to express the phase difference between two waves in terms of the fraction of the wavelength. o A phase difference of pi/2 (90 degrees) is a 1/4th wavelength shift.
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Two sound waves with identical wavelengths of 1.5 m travel towards each other from speakers separated by 30m. Both speakers were turned on at the same time and have initially the same phase. You stand 5m from one of the speakers. What is the phase difference where you hear them? Example Problem:
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Lecture 7 - Superpos. Waves (14.1-14.2) - Lecture 7...

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