Higgins 318 Syllabus, F08

Higgins 318 Syllabus, F08 - 1 COURSE: Introduction to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
COURSE: Introduction to Ethics                  Fall 2008 Philosophy 318 Unique # 43435, 43440, 43445 TIME:  Tuesdays and Thursdays,  11:00 a.m.-11:50 a.m., and a third hour LOCATION: GAR 1.126            INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Kathleen Higgins            OFFICE: Waggener Hall, Room 203 471-5564                      OFFICE HOURS: Tuesdays, 3:30-5:30 p.m. E-MAIL: [email protected] COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will consider several major ethical theories in  the Western and Chinese philosophical traditions as  guides to practical living.  The primary question to be  addressed is:  What is the good life for human beings, in  theory and in practice?      COURSE OBJECTIVES: By the end of this course you should: 1.  Be familiar with the basic tenets of the ethical theories  considered. 2.  Be able to compare these positions and to discuss the  approach the specific theories would take to given ethical  problems in short essays. 3.  Be able to define basic terms (such as  "consequentialism," "ethical relativism," etc.) and to relate  them to the ethical positions considered. 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4.  Be able to identify and evaluate your own ethical  position, or at least be aware of areas in which this  position is ill defined. TEXTBOOKS: Robert C. Solomon and Clancy W. Martin, eds.,  Morality  and the Good Life:  An Introduction through Classical  Sources  (fourth edition) Milan Kundera,  The Unbearable Lightness of Being POLICIES: Late assignments will automatically receive ten fewer  percentage points than they would otherwise have  received.  Late assignments will not be accepted more  than one week after the date due.  Late assignments will  not be accepted after the last day of class. Makeup exams or extensions will be arranged only in  situations of an emergency or serious illness.  The  instructor may ask for evidence. I will make myself available to discuss appropriate  academic accommodations that you may require as a  student with a disability.   IMPORTANT DATES AND GRADING September 9 Case Studies 10% September 23 “Why Be Moral?” letter 15% September 25   Exam 1 15% October 23   Kantian and Utilitarian Dilemma paper 15% November 11 Exam 2 15% December 2 Final Project (“Pearls of Wisdom”) 15% December 4 “Meeting of the Minds” Debate 5% Participation  10% 2
Background image of page 2
3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Syllabus Page numbers refer to  Morality and the Good Life , 4th edition, unless otherwise noted. August 28
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/09/2008 for the course PHL 318 taught by Professor Higgins during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 12

Higgins 318 Syllabus, F08 - 1 COURSE: Introduction to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online