AG 401 P5 - Cristine Rojas Article 8 The Tragedy of the Commons Garrett Hardin Authors Note Garrett Hardin Garrett Hardin was a professor of Human

AG 401 P5 - Cristine Rojas Article 8 The Tragedy of the...

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Cristine Rojas Article 8: “The Tragedy of the Commons” Garrett Hardin April 30, 2017 Authors Note: Garrett Hardin Garrett Hardin was a professor of Human Ecology at UC Santa Barbara and writer, he famously wrote this article “The Tragedy of the Commons” where he warns us about overpopulation. He is known for coining Hardin’s First Law of Human Ecology. Since he was an accredited professor his opinion will be valid and measurable. Article 8: “The Tragedy of the Commons”
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Garrett Hardin Notes: “If the great powers continue to look for solutions in the area of science and technology only, the result will be to worsen the situation.” A technical solution may be defined as one that requires a change only in the techniques of the natural sciences, demanding little or nothing in the way of change in human values or ideas of morality. most people who anguish over the population problem are trying to find a way to avoid the evils of overpopulation without relinquishing any of the privileges they now enjoy. The population problem cannot be solved in a technical way, any more than can the problem of winning the game of tick-tack-toe. In a finite world, this means that the per capita share of the world's goods must steadily decrease. We must face in the next few generations with the foreseeable technology, it is clear that we will greatly increase human misery if we do not, during the immediate future, assume that the world available to the terrestrial human population is finite. "Space" is no escape. It is not mathematically possible to maximize for two (or more) variables at the same time. To live, any organism must have a source of energy (for example, food). This energy is utilized for two purposes: mere maintenance and work for man, maintenance of life. Maximizing population does not maximize goods. Bentham's goal is impossible. The problem of the acquisition of energy is replaced by the problem of its dissipation. Goods are incommensurable, incommensurables cannot be compared. The most rapidly growing populations on earth today are the most miserable. Men will control their individual fertility so as to produce the optimum population. "This inevitableness of destiny can only be illustrated in terms of human life by incidents which in fact involve unhappiness. For it is only by them that the futility of escape can be made evident in the drama." A pasture open to all. It is to be expected that each herdsman will try to keep as many cattle as possible on the commons. An arrangement may work practically agreeably for centuries because tribal wars, poaching, and disease keep the numbers of both man and beast well below the carrying capacity of the land.
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  • Spring '15
  • nicole
  • Water supply, Water crisis, Garrett Hardin

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