AG 401 Assignment #2 - Tristan Velazquez Article 3 Farmer in Chief Michael Pollan Author Note Michael Pollan is an author journalist and a professor

AG 401 Assignment #2 - Tristan Velazquez Article 3 Farmer...

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Tristan Velazquez Article 3: “Farmer in Chief” Michael Pollan 4/8/17 Author Note: Michael Pollan is an author, journalist and a professor. Currently he is a professor for journalism at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He was born on February 6, 1955. He went to school at Bennington College and received a B.A. in English, and then he went to Columbia University to receive his M.A. in English.
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Article #3: “Farmer in Chief” Notes The last time that there were high food prices that caused a real political peril was when Nixon was in office The government pays the farmers for all of their corn, soybeans, wheat and the rice that they can produce Factory farms can purchase grain for much less than other farmers, which leads to factory farms fatten up animals with the grain for a much cheaper cost Fossil fuel, which gave cheap energy to trucking food and pumping water, caused New York City to now get all their produce from California instead of places closer Today the government farms only care about the quantity of crops rather than the quality of their crops The author believes that commodity farmers should be able to grow whatever crops they want so there can be more of a diversity in crops A decentralized food system can have good effects on produce, for example the food that is eaten closer to where its grown does not require as much processing America has a huge demand that keeps growing for local and regional food so that means that the farm market is going up to about 4700 To start a change with the food system, it must start with the children first and especially in the schools they attend Article #3: “Farmers in Chief” Q&A 1.) What is a monoculture? What are pros and cons of monocultures?
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A monoculture is a when you grow a single crop, plant or livestock at a farm one at a time. An example would be a farm that only grows corn or a farm that only grows soybeans. The pros on a monoculture is that you will have plenty of a certain crop that you can eat, sell or do what you please with it.
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