Lecture 4 - Outline for today's lecture (Ch 14, con't) More...

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Outline for today's lecture (Ch 14, con't) More complicated (and realistic) Genetics Dominance Multiple alleles, pleiotropy, epistasis Polygenic traits and environmental effects Pedigree Analysis
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Review from Thursday: Mendel's Laws 1. The Law of Segregation - ONE LOCUS If the locus is heterozygous, half the gametes get one allele, half the gametes get the other allele 1. The Law of Independent Assortment - MULTIPLE LOCI Alleles at each locus segregate independently of alleles at other loci if they are on different chromosomes Not true if loci are on the same chromosome
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Extending Mendelian Genetics: Incomplete dominance Recall in Mendel's experiments the F1 always had the same phenotype as one of the homozygotes i.e., the underlying loci showed "COMPLETE" DOMINANCE THIS IS NOT ALWAYS TRUE!!! (Or even usually true)
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Incomplete dominance - an example Snapdragons (and carnations) F1 intermediate btw two parents F2 segregates parental phenotypes in 1:2:1 ratio X P F1 F2 Self
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Incomplete dominance - an example Two alleles, C R and C W Heterozygote is intermediate to homozygotes Parental genotypes segregate in F2 generation in expected frequencies Nature of pigment production C R C R C W C R C R C R C W C R C W C W C R C W C W C R C W C W
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Extending Mendelian Genetics: co-dominance Both alleles at a locus affect the phenotype in distinguishable ways Heterozygote phenotype is not "intermediate" between the two but rather has its own specific phenotype e.g, protein mobility on an electrophoretic gel
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e: Example of protein gel migration Two alleles, "slow" (S) and "fast" (F) F is (more) negatively charged than S, so migrates faster in an electrical gradient What about the heterozygote? COO
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This note was uploaded on 07/03/2008 for the course BSC 2010 taught by Professor Bowes during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture 4 - Outline for today's lecture (Ch 14, con't) More...

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