The Colorado River

The Colorado River - The Colorado River The Colorado River...

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The Colorado River
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The Colorado River Compact (1922) The Colorado River Compact divides the Colorado River into Upper and Lower Basins with the division being at Lees Ferry on the Colorado River one mile below the Paria River in Arizona. The Lower Basin states are Arizona, California, and Nevada, with small portions of New Mexico and Utah that are tributary to the Colorado River below Lees Ferry. The Upper Basin states are Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, with a small portion of Arizona tributary to the Colorado River above Lees Ferry. The Compact apportions the right to exclusive beneficial consumptive use of 7.5 million acre-feet of water from the "Colorado River System" in perpetuity to the Upper Basin and the Lower Basin It provides water for Mexico pursuant to treaty. Water must first come from any surplus over the waters allocated to the states Upper Basin states will not withhold water and the states of the Lower Basin shall not require delivery of water which cannot reasonably be applied to domestic and agricultural uses
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Boulder Canyon Project Act (1928) This Act authorized the construction of Hoover Dam and the All-American Canal to the Imperial Valley in California. It also, in effect, apportioned the Lower Basin states' allocation under the Colorado River Compact. Below are the volumes of water given to the Lower Basin states: California--4.4 million acre-feet Arizona--2.8 million acre-feet Nevada--0.3 million acre-feet Arizona was also given exclusive beneficial use of the Gila River outside of the mainstem allocation of 2.8 million acre-feet.
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Hoover Dam (Boulder Canyon Project)
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Mexican Treaty (1944) In 1944, the United States and Mexico signed a treaty concerning the waters of certain international rivers, including the Colorado River. The treaty guaranteed a scheduled annual delivery of 1.5 million acre-feet to Mexico (except in the event of an extraordinary drought or serious accident) and up to 1.7 million acre- feet per year in years of surplus on the Colorado River
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Upper Colorado River Compact (1948) In 1948, the Upper Basin states entered into a compact which apportioned among themselves the waters of the Colorado River available to the Upper Basin by the 1922 Colorado River Compact. The 1948 Compact apportioned to Arizona 50,000 acre-feet per year while the other Upper Basin states received a percentage of the remaining apportionment as follows: Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51.75% Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.00% Wyoming. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.00% New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 11.25% Under this formula, if 7.5 million acre- feet were available to the Upper Basin annually, Colorado's apportionment would provide for the consumptive use of 3,855,375 acre-feet of water annually. As of 1985, Colorado only beneficially
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The Colorado River - The Colorado River The Colorado River...

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