Handout - Lecture 2, part 1 - Neurophysiology

Handout - Lecture 2, part 1 - Neurophysiology -...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/12/09 Neurophysiology
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5/12/09 Historical Introduction Reticular Theory – nervous system is, like the circulatory system, a meshwork in which axons split into finer and finer branches and were continuous with dendrites of other cells Neural Doctrine – neurons are the basic structural and functional units of the nervous system (late 1800s)
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5/12/09 Neurons Structural regions Soma – The most prominent part of the neuron is the cell body or soma. The soma is filled with a watery liquid called cytoplasm and contains a number of organelles. (page 24) Dendrites – Dendrites are extensions that branch out from the cell body to receive information from other neurons. Their branching
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5/12/09 Neurons Functional zones Receptive (INPUT) zone : dendrites and soma Conductile zone: axon Transmitting (OUTPUT) zone: terminals
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5/12/09
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5/12/09 How do neurons work? Ions – particles with an electrical charge Located in intracellular and extracellular fluid Two major types
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5/12/09 How do neurons work? Membrane potential – difference in electrical charge that exists between the inside and outside of a cell Resting membrane potential: -70 mV
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5/12/09 How do neurons work? Forces acting on Ions Diffusion (osmotic) – the process by which molecules distribute themselves evenly throughout a solution Concentration gradient – molecules move from areas in which their concentration is high to areas of low concentration
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How do neurons work? Forces acting on Ions
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2008 for the course PSY 10994 taught by Professor Ericdonny during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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Handout - Lecture 2, part 1 - Neurophysiology -...

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