Final study guidestats.

Final study guidestats. - Disclaimer: These questions are...

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Disclaimer: These questions are designed to test both your ability to solve hypothesis testing problems (the first half) and your conceptual understanding of some of the concepts that underlie hypothesis testing (the second half). However, this should not be viewed as a comprehensive study guide, and there is no guarantee that anything included within will be relevant for the final exam. Computational questions 1. You are a TA for an undergraduate statistics course who leads two discussion sections each week. After the class midterm, you are curious as to whether your students differed from the rest of the class. The population of students who were not in your sections got an average of 57 points with a standard deviation of 8 points. Students in your sections, which have a total of 60 people in them, got an average of 55 points. Conduct the appropriate hypothesis test, at " =.05, to determine whether students in your sections performed differently than the class average. Provide the information indicated below: (a) Research problem (b) Statistical hypotheses (c) Decision rule (d) Calculations (e) Decision (f) Interpretation 2. Construct a 95% confidence interval for the population mean of the midterm scores of students in your sections, and provide an interpretation. 3. Since you are secretly convinced that you are the best TA in the class, you are determined to find statistical evidence that shows that students in your sections do better than those in other sections. You decide, quite reasonably, that the only students who might be benefiting from your incredible teaching skills are those who actually attend section. After secretly taking attendance by checking to see who picked up their homeworks from the pile, you determine that 15 students regularly show up to your sections. These students got an average of 62 points on the midterm, with a standard deviation of 6 points. Conduct the appropriate t-test, at =.05, to determine whether students who regularly attended your sections performed better than the class average. Provide the information indicated below: (a) Research problem (b) Statistical hypotheses (c) Decision rule (d) Calculations (e) Decision (f) Interpretation 4. Every year, Peter and Peggy Piper pick a peck of pickled peppers. And, every year, they argue about who is better at picking pickled peppers. After decades of squabbling, the Pipers come to you, a noted statistician, and ask for your help in resolving their dispute. Here are the number of pecks of pickled peppers they picked each of the last seven years:
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Peggy Piper Peter Piper 17 10 25 14 22 7 19 12 15 18 22 6 23 3 (Assume that the underlying populations are normally distributed, with equal variances.) Conduct the appropriate hypothesis test, at " =.05, to determine whether Peggy and Peter Piper pick different numbers of pecks of pickled peppers. Provide the information indicated below: (a) Research problem (b) Statistical hypotheses (c) Decision rule (d) Calculations (e)
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This note was uploaded on 09/12/2008 for the course PSYC 60 taught by Professor Ard during the Fall '08 term at UCSD.

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Final study guidestats. - Disclaimer: These questions are...

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