Physicians_III_08

Physicians_III_08 - Physicians III PAM 435 Discussion...

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Unformatted text preview: Physicians III PAM 435 March 25, 2008 Discussion Issues (Continued) 1)Does the U.S. have too many or too few physicians? 2)How is the number of physicians determined? What factors are important? 1)Why is it so hard to get into medical school, and to enter specialties such as dermatology or orthopedic surgery? Medical School Practicing Medicine Residency Training 4 years 1 – 5 years 30+ years AMA and AAMC accredit US medical schools. Difficult for new schools to open (e.g., entity must be non-profit) Positions available in 26 specialties at 1,200 teaching hospitals Must receive at least 1 year of training at an ACGME-accredited program to be licensed in U.S. Overview of Physician Training Physician fees and physician earnings vary substantially across specialties 173 125 140 156 195 229 275 1900 1930 1960 1970 1980 1990 2004 Number of Physicians Per Capita in U.S. Has Almost Doubled Since 1960 Physicians per 100,000 population Source: Blumenthal, 2004; Feldstein, 2007. Flexner report (1910): too many low-quality MDs in U.S. 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 50,000 1 9 6 1 9 6 5 1 9 7 1 9 7 5 1 9 8 1 9 8 5 1 9 9 1 9 9 5 2 2 5 Percent 7% 9% 11% 23% 30% 35% 40% 43% 47% 50% Female Source: Association of American Medical Colleges. Number of Applicants to U.S. Medical Schools and Number of First-Year Medical Students, 1960-2005 First-year medical students Applicants Health Manpower Training Act (1964) $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 5 1 5 9 6 5 6 8 7 7 2 7 4 7 6 7 8 8 8 2 8 4 8 6 8 8 9 9 2 9 4 9 6 9 8 Year 2000 (2000 $s) Source: American Medical Association, Socioeconomic Monitoring Study. All physicians Primary care physicians Mean Physician Income, in 2000 Dollars Note: primary care physicians include pediatricians, family practitioners, and general internists. Physician Income Grew in the 1950s, 1960s, and Late 1980s $205.7 $152.4 $225.6-10.2-8.2-7.1-2.1 6.9 Source: Community Tracking Study Physician Survey. % Change in Income, 1995-2003, Adjusted for Inflation Rates of Return in Medicine Probably Worsened Recently Primary Care MDs Surgical Spets All Physicians Medical Spets U.S. Professional/Technical Workers Medical School Practicing Medicine Residency Training 4 years 1 – 5 years 30+ years AMA and AAMC accredit US medical schools....
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This note was uploaded on 09/12/2008 for the course PAM 4350 taught by Professor Nicholson during the Spring '08 term at Cornell.

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Physicians_III_08 - Physicians III PAM 435 Discussion...

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