Chapter 2 notes - Summary Plato's The Apology is an account...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Summary  Plato's  The Apology  is an account of the speech Socrates  makes at the trial in which he is  charged with not recognizing the gods recognized by the state, inventing new deities,  and corrupting the youth of Athens.  Socrates' speech, however, is by no means an "apology"  in our modern understanding of the word. The name of the dialogue derives from the Greek  "apologia," which translates as a defense, or a speech made in defense. Thus, in  The Apology,  Socrates attempts to defend himself and his conduct--certainly not to apologize for it. For the most part, Socrates speaks in a very plain, conversational manner. He explains that he  has no experience with the law courts and that he will instead speak in the manner to which  he is accustomed: with honesty and directness. He explains that his behavior stems from a  prophecy by the oracle at Delphi which claimed that he was the wisest of all men.  Recognizing  his ignorance in most worldly affairs, Socrates concluded that he must be wiser than other men  only in that he knows that he knows nothing. In order to spread this peculiar wisdom, Socrates  explains that he considered it his duty to question supposed "wise" men and to expose their false  wisdom as ignorance.  These activities earned him much admiration amongst the youth of  Athens, but much hatred and anger from the people he embarrassed. He cites their contempt  as the reason for his being put on trial.  Socrates then proceeds to  interrogate Meletus , the man primarily responsible for bringing  Socrates before the jury. This is the only instance in  The Apology  of the  elenchus,  or cross- examination, which is so central to most Platonic dialogues. His conversation with Meletus,  however, is a poor example of this method, as it seems more directed toward embarrassing  Meletus than toward arriving at the truth.  In a famous passage, Socrates likens himself to a gadfly stinging the lazy horse which is the 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 4

Chapter 2 notes - Summary Plato's The Apology is an account...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online