Chapters 7 - CHAPTER 7 Minor Parties: Minor parties have...

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CHAPTER 7 Minor Parties: Minor parties have many obstacles that prevent them from achieving extensive electoral success: 1. Minor party candidates do not automatically qualify for ballot access – often they must collect thousands of signatures from registered voters on a comprehensive petition. This process can easily take several weeks to a few months. If a minor party candidate is running for president, he/she may have to collect signatures in all 50 states. The number os signatures required varies from state to state. 2. Minor party candidates often have trouble raising enough campaign funds to be competitive with the major party candidates. Voters and interest groups tend to want to back candidates that have a higher change of winning. Minor party candidates are often forced to spend personal funds to cover much of their campaign costs. 3. Minor party candidates often have their ideas adopted by the mainstream candidates once they start to receive significant support. This often takes the momentum away from minor candidates. 4. Many voters have always been in the habit of voting for either the democratic or republican candidate, and are hesitant to cast their
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2008 for the course POLS 1101 taught by Professor Lenny during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Perimeter.

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Chapters 7 - CHAPTER 7 Minor Parties: Minor parties have...

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