Sex and the Security State - Sex and the Security State Gender Sexuality and\"Subversion at Brazil's Escola Superior de Guerra 1964-1985 Author(s

Sex and the Security State - Sex and the Security State...

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Sex and the Security State: Gender, Sexuality, and "Subversion" at Brazil's Escola Superior de Guerra, 1964-1985 Author(s): Benjamin Cowan Source: Journal of the History of Sexuality, Vol. 16, No. 3, Latin American Sexualities (Sep., 2007), pp. 459-481 Published by: University of Texas Press Stable URL: Accessed: 13-03-2017 20:24 UTC JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at University of Texas Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal of the History of Sexuality This content downloaded from 128.189.152.234 on Mon, 13 Mar 2017 20:24:36 UTC All use subject to
Sex and the Security State: Gender, Sexuality, and "Subversion" at Brazil's Escola Superior de Guerra, 1964-1985 BENJAMIN COWAN University of California, Los Angeles The maintenance of a reasonable state of national security constitutes a continuous and unceasing process . . . [because] the Nation itself . . . will always have contrary interests that threaten its sovereignty and freedom, circumstances that destabilize its internal life, and ideologies that challenge faith in its institutions. Gen. Oswaldo Cordeiro de Farias, "A Seguranca Nacional no panorama mundial da atualidade"1 IN LATE MARCH 19 6 4 "contrary interests" and threats to "nationa security" reached an intolerable pitch, as far as top Brazilian militar officials were concerned. Amid unprecedented polarization in nation politics, populist President Joao Goulart accelerated his leftward drif sanctioning radically nationalistic economic and social reforms. Goular nicknamed "Jango," even dared to support the unionization of enliste men, a move that-from the perspective of an alarmed and incensed office corps-constituted a direct threat to the military hierarchy. Anti-Goula forces responded swiftly and unilaterally, and by the morning of 2 April Brazilians could harbor little doubt that Jango's reformist presidency had come to a sudden and dramatic end. A military coup d'etat, supported Goulart's civilian opponents and by the United States' diplomatic rep resentatives, had begun on 31 March, its conspirators accusing Goular of attempting to achieve a communist dictatorship in Brazil. The "Rev lution of 1964"-for so the coup plotters dubbed their assumption of 'Speech delivered at Escola Superior de Guerra, 1961,18-19, Escola Superior de Guerr Biblioteca General Cordeiro de Farias (hereafter ESG BGCF), document number C-01- Unless otherwise noted, all translations from the Portuguese are my own.

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