PHIL 140-Aristotle

PHIL 140-Aristotle - All human beings seek happiness...

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All human beings seek happiness Happiness: Activity of the soul in accordance w/ virtue Virtue: Moral and Intellectual Moral Virtue: Training and habit, someone in between Intellectual Virtue: Produces the most perfect happiness and is found in the activity of reason or contemplation ‘Only the old and experienced people’ can teach these things about moral virtues Money is for the sake of something else Happiness is the end desire –“we choose always for itself and never for the sake of something else Happiness can be defined differently o Good life and good action o Virtuous o Pleasure Pleasure is the state of soul Happiness is the best, noblest, and most pleasant thing in the world However, happiness cannot be achieved without external goods such as friends, riches, political power etc. Is happiness acquired by learning or by habituation or some other sort of training, or comes in virtue of some divine providence or by chance Complete life is required
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PHIL 140-Aristotle - All human beings seek happiness...

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