The Loss of the Creature - Miguel Jimenez UW English 131 Essay#4 Essay#4 The Loss of the Creature While in a tuberculosis asylum Walker Percy began to

The Loss of the Creature - Miguel Jimenez UW English 131...

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Miguel Jimenez October 10, 2011 UW English 131 Essay #4 Essay #4: The Loss of the Creature While in a tuberculosis asylum, Walker Percy began to question everything he had once believed. He concluded that everything he thought to be his own beliefs might actually have been prescribed and imposed by society. In his writing “The Loss of the Creature” Percy claims that society is responsible for the lack of individuals and we face an uphill battle to recover our sovereignty, “The person is not something one can study and provide for; he is something one struggles for” (Percy 9). Percy begins by discussing the Grand Canyon—he suggests that although we may be seeing the same Grand Canyon as Garcia Lopez de Cardenas we may only be seeing a millionth of the true beauty. Sightseers do not appreciate the Grand Canyon on its own qualities; they appreciate it based on how appropriately or poorly it follows their established image of the Grand Canyon. They might find themselves in doubt about whether it as special as it should be. Percy claims that we have lost the “Value P” because society has already formulated our views on the Grand Canyon through postcards, books, and brochures. Establishing a picture in a sightseer’s head ruins the beauty of sight— possibly even making them feel cheated, leaving them dissatisfied. Take for example a daughter receiving a car for her sweet sixteen; she knows she is receiving a car but does not know the model. When it comes time to see the car her mind begins to wonder— maybe her father bought her that 2010 Land Rover or perhaps the 2011 BMW.
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Jimenez Instead, what she comes in contact with is a 1999 Ford Escort; because of her expectations it is no longer an “accidental encounter” and she finds herself disappointed. He also indicates that we don’t get the full picture because of the million who have also seen it; he ask, “Is looking like sucking; the more lookers, the less there is to see?” (2). Percy describes a couple visiting Mexico who wants to get away from the “beaten track” and their fellow American companions; they then find themselves lost and end up in an Indian village. There, the couple experiences a religious ceremony and corn dance; they say to themselves, “This is it” and “Now we are really living”. The couple spends
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