Historic Preservation essay

Historic Preservation essay - PD 212- Public Meeting...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PD 212- Public Meeting Assessment Project Report on the Buffalo Preservation Board Meeting of April 13, 2006 Evan Schweigel Evan Schweigel Due April 18, 2006 PD 212 Professor Palumbo Public Meeting Assessment Project
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Of all the sub-fields which make up urban planning, historic preservation has the potential to be the most rewarding or the most frustrating depending on which of the involved parties you talk with. There exists a delicate balance between preserving the important relics of a city’s history and promoting new growth, a thin line between closely holding on to our dearest memories and holding back our future’s promise by focusing too much on the past. In a city like Buffalo, the historic preservation process can be highly contentious thanks the juxtaposition of centuries of rich architecture which need and deserve protection, and a dwindling population with a shoddy economy that needs all the help and new opportunity it can get. The possible frustration with this system was evident as someone in attendance at the Preservation Board meeting cynically complained to me that, “you can’t blow your nose in one of these historic districts.” Yet this is where the Buffalo Preservation Board finds its role, regulating any alterations made to the exteriors of some seven-thousand structures in eight designated historic districts and over eighty-five other local historic landmarks, along with various other duties. 1 The Preservation Board is an excellent example of the cooperation between public and private interests that is central to successful planning: its goal being two satisfied parties emerging with a result that pleases both the private citizen and the community. The scene for April 13 th ’s Preservation Board meeting was surprisingly casual and low-key compared to many other planning meetings in Buffalo, especially those that take place in the grand Common Council chambers. In a modest conference room on the 9 th floor of City Hall was a long table with chairs and nameplates for the members of the board, facing a group of chairs for the public audience. Agendas were available on a table 1 "Preservation Board." City of Buffalo. 17 Apr. 2006 <http://www.city- buffalo.com/document_2104_198.html>.
Background image of page 2
as you entered, easels were arranged for the upcoming presentations, and microphones and a tape recorder were set up so that the meeting would be on public record. Overall the setting was very comfortable and welcoming to a visiting college student who expected a stuffy courtroom-like atmosphere. As the “players” of the meeting began to trickle in, you could somewhat
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Historic Preservation essay - PD 212- Public Meeting...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online