Early Debates about Accountability and Responsibility

Early Debates about Accountability and Responsibility -...

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Excerpt from Shafritz and Hyde (eds.) (1997), Classics of Public Administration , p. 65. Early Debates about Accountability and Responsibility It is possible to get the impression that during this formative period of public administration most of the focus was on internal issues: management practices and problems, organizational behavior and structures, and budgeting and personnel issues. However, there was also ongoing a profound discussion, indeed a debate, over external issues—specifically the concept of administrative responsibility. Basically the issue involved was how we could ensure that governmental administration, in pursuit of being responsive to interest groups, executive and legislative forces, and constituencies, would act legally and responsibly. This issue was hotly discussed in the late 1930s and early 1940s by Carl Friedrich (1901-1984) and Herman Finer (1898-1969), two prominent political scientists. A lively debate ensued between the two. Friedrich argued that administrative responsibility is best assured internally, through professionalism or
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2008 for the course PAF 460 taught by Professor Sackton during the Spring '08 term at ASU.

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Early Debates about Accountability and Responsibility -...

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