6501Week5Discussion2 - ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK 1 NURS 6501 Advanced Pathophysiology Week 5 Discussion 2 Anaphylactic Shock INITIAL POST Pathophysiology

6501Week5Discussion2 - ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK 1 NURS 6501...

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ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK 1 NURS 6501: Advanced Pathophysiology Week 5 Discussion 2 Anaphylactic Shock INITIAL POST Pathophysiology Anaphylaxis is a rare but severe allergic reaction. It can occur suddenly, can worsen quickly and can be deadly. Anaphylactic shock begins with exposure of a sensitized individual to an allergen, such as insect venom, shellfish, foods, and medications (Huether & McCance, 2017). Anaphylaxis is a form of distributive shock. The reaction occurs when the body’s antigen recognizes an allergen, or trigger, causing antibodies to bind to the antigen. This leads to the release of histamine, bradykinin, and leukotrienes resulting in vasodilation that results in maldistribution of blood within the body and increased capillary permeability. In turn, this causes decreased venous return, decreased cardiac output, decreased tissue perfusion and severe hypotension. With the increased capillary permeability, this causes decreased blood flow and a fluid shift causing edema and inflammation. Extravascular effects consist of the constriction of extravascular smooth muscle causing laryngospasm and bronchospasm; other symptoms can include abdominal pain and diarrhea. Without prompt medical treatment, the body continues to a state of shock and eventually, death. Treatment Anaphylactic shock typically has a sudden onset and can progress to death within minutes of treatment is not provided. Treatment varies based off if the patient is presenting with a
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ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK 2 mild or severe presentation. Early symptoms can include dizziness, itchiness, nausea, vomiting,
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  • Spring '15
  • anaphylactic shock, Allergen immunotherapy

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