45792-UlabyISMCh07

45792-UlabyISMCh07 - 317 Chapter 7 Plane-Wave Propagation...

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317 Chapter 7: Plane-Wave Propagation Lesson #43 Chapter — Section: 7-1 Topics: Time-harmonic fields Highlights: Phasors Complex permittivity Wave equations Special Illustrations:
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318 Lesson #44 Chapter — Section: 7-2 Topics: Waves in lossless media Highlights: Uniform plane waves Intrinsic impedance Wave properties Special Illustrations: Example 7-1 CD-ROM Modules 7.3 and 7.4
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319 Lesson #45 and 46 Chapter — Section: 7-3 Topics: Wave polarization Highlights: Definition of polarization Linear, circular, elliptical Special Illustrations: CD-ROM Demos 7.1-7.5 Liquid Crystal Display Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) LCDs are used in digital clocks, cellular phones, desktop and laptop computers, and some televisions and other electronic systems. They offer a decided advantage over other display technologies, such as cathode ray tubes, in that they are much lighter and thinner and consume a lot less power to operate. LCD technology relies on special electrical and optical properties of a class of materials known as liquid crystals, first discovered in the 1880s by botanist Friedrich Reinitzer . Physical Principle Liquid crystals are neither a pure solid nor a pure liquid, but rather a hybrid of both. One particular variety of interest is the twisted nematic liquid crystal whose molecules have a natural tendency to assume a twisted spiral structure when the material is sandwiched between finely grooved glass substrates with orthogonal orientations (A) . Note that the molecules in contact with the grooved surfaces align themselves in parallel along the grooves. The molecular spiral causes the crystal to behave like a wave polarizer ; unpolarized light incident upon the entrance substrate follows the orientation of the spiral, emerging through the exit substrate with its polarization (direction of electric field) parallel to the groove’s direction.
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320 Lesson #47 Chapter — Section: 7-4 Topics: Waves in lossy media Highlights: Attenuation and skin depth Low loss medium Good conductor Special Illustrations: CD-ROM Demos 7.6-7.8
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321 Lesson #48 Chapter — Section: 7-5 Topics: Current flow in conductors Highlights: Skin depth dependence on frequency Surface impedance Special Illustrations:
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322 Lesson #49 Chapter — Section: 7-6 Topics: EM power density Highlights: Power density in a lossless medium Power density in a lossy medium Time-average power Special Illustrations: CD-ROM Module 7.5
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CHAPTER 7 323 Chapter 7 Section 7-2: Propagation in Lossless Media Problem 7.1 The magnetic field of a wave propagating through a certain nonmagnetic material is given by H ˆ z 30cos 10 8 t 0 5 y (mA/m) Find (a) the direction of wave propagation, (b) the phase velocity, (c) the wavelength in the material, (d) the relative permittivity of the material, and (e) the electric field phasor.
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