RSDQ7 - Inas Syed RSDQ 7 The articles we discussed this...

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Inas Syed RSDQ 7 The articles we discussed this week are Chapter 8 from Inequality and Stratification: Race, Class and Gender by Robert Rothman and Aftershock: The Next Economy and America’s Future by Robert Reich. The first article starts out by talking about the different categories that people can be part of, what is called Social Stratification. There are different categories that apply to many people like class, race and gender. These are what makes the world think about people and how society is organized. The whole basis for this chapter is to talk about how these different categories influence the ways that people get treated in the criminal justice system. The classifications in which people are organized in give “life chances.” The book talks about how life chances are “the typical chances for a supply of goods, external living conditions, and personal life experiences” (Weber, 1946:180). The difference that people have in these categories changes the amount of benefits that a person gets per their situations. The book talks about how we may think that the criminal justice system is more biased to African- Americans but it affects poorer people rather than only people of color, which it does but not to the extent that we think. One of the graphs in the book shows that a large amount (at a rate of 45.5 percent) of people who make less than $7,500 are affected by violent criminal victimization
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