Short Writing 2 - Short Writing 2 Achieving Peace Inas Syed...

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Short Writing 2: Achieving Peace Inas Syed Peace studies is known as a social science field in which the examination of violent and non-violent behaviors with a purpose of understanding the processes leads to a more desirable human condition. 1 The study of peace is involved in the de-escalation and prevention of violent actions like terrorism, war, genocide and the violation of human rights. The denial of freedom of expression, peaceful assembly, affordable housing, the suffering from preventable diseases, and the undermining of a person because of their religion, ethnicity, gender, age or sexual preferences are all under the classification of “violence”. 2 The word peace has many different definitions and connotations to it. “The Promise of Peace, the Promise of War” by Barash and Webel, states that there are two types of peace positive and negative. Negative peace represents the “absence of war.” With negative peace, there is “no active, organized military violence” taking place. 3 Positive peace on the other hand “denotes the simultaneous presence of many desirable states of mind and society, such as harmony, justice, equity, etc.”. 4 This kind of peace is what you may think of when you hear “world peace” when everything is fair for everyone and the world lives together without conflict. In order to attain or pursue peace, one should have the means and the ability to work toward positive peace. Many of the things that obstruct peace is the structural violence that is done by governments. Structural violence is when there is an indirect force causing harm and disorder, on a large scale, to a certain population. In class, we learned about the structural violence that 1 Dugan, M. 1989. "Peace Studies at the Graduate Level." The Annals of the American Academy of Political Science: Peace Studies: Past and Future , pg. 74.
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