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1. Levels of cross-cultural understanding 2. How do communication styles tend to differ between cultures? Kexin Gong 101052717 Submitted to Professor Shaukat Time: May 18 th , 2017
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Levels of cross-cultural understanding The levels of cross-cultural understanding can be classified into 4 levels. The first level is the awareness of superficial or very visible cultural traits or stereotypes. These information is usually acquired from travelling, textbooks or magazines. The reactions to these information are usually feeling unbelievable, exotic and bizarre. The second level is the awareness of significant& sub- cultural traits that contrast markedly with one’s own. Now it is easy to fall into culture conflict situations, and the reactions are often being unbelievable, frustrating and irrational. The third level is the awareness of significant& sub-cultural traits that contrast markedly with one’s own as well, but in this level, the intellectual analysis is shown, and the interpretation would be believable and cognitively. The last level is the awareness of how another culture feels from the standpoint of an insider. In this level, the individual is immersed into one cultural and lives the culture, and his feeling would be believable due to subjective similarity. As for myself, I am undergoing the transferring from one culture to another culture, so I want to tell some examples of my own experiences. Before I came to Canada, I have gathered some information about this country through many channels like consulting the people who have been to Canada, browsing the webpages and the social media. Almost all the information is positive. Canadians love animals; living in this country is safer than in America; … In a word, the information told me the culture of Canada is “welcoming and friendly”. Then I come to live and study in this country. At first, I was not used to giving tips to the servers in the restaurant and I always forgot it. This could be one of the cultural conflicts. 1
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After a while, I have been getting more used to the life here, and I realize that there are much more things under the big topic “culture”, from how people treat others in daily life to the politics and business of a country.
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