Fermentation Lab in progress - FERMENTATION LAB 4 Rate of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
FERMENTATION LAB 4 Rate of Fermentation using Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and Measured by Liquid Level and Production of CO2 at Different Temperatures Alexandra Spina Biology 204 Athabasca University
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fermentation Lab 4 Abstract This experiment demonstrates the effect that temperature has on the fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisae (bakers yeast) and the amount of CO2 production. This experiment was conducted by preparing two sucrose-yeast mixtures using water at different temperatures, then filling marked test tube one and beaker one with temperature 13 and marked test tube two and beaker two with temperature 38 . Once the test tubes were inverted and placed within the beakers, the test tubes were observed and the amount of displaced liquid and CO2 production recorded in ten minute increments. By observing the change in liquid levels as the CO2 displaces the liquid at 13 and 38 , the relationship between the temperature and speed of the chemical reaction can be seen. This experiment successfully demonstrated the direct effect temperature plays in fermentation.
Image of page 2
Fermentation Lab 4 Rate of Fermentation using Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and Measured by Liquid Level and Production of CO2 at Different Temperatures Purpose: This experiment involves measuring the amount of CO2 generated by a sucrose-yeast mixture at two different temperatures in 10-minute increments. The goal of the experiment is to show if the amount of CO2 produced changes based on the temperature of the sucrose-yeast mixture. Introduction: Fermentation is a biological process in which a microorganism converts carbohydrates , typically starch or sugar, into simpler components such as alcohols , acids, and gases. More broadly, the term fermentation is also used to refer to any transformation of organic matter by enzymes . The most common groups of microorganisms involved in the fermentation of food include yeasts , bacteria, and mold, which produce enzymes that catalyze the fermentation process (Wikipedia… 2016). Fermentation also occurs in oxygen-starved muscle cells, as in the case of lactic acid fermentation (Wikipedia… 2017) . Fermentation, an anaerobic (non-oxygen requiring) process, and cellular respiration, both begin with glycolysis, and take place when there is little to no available oxygen or no electron transport chain to make ATP. Cellular respiration is a three-stage process that a majority of living organisms use to convert possible energy found in food molecules into adenosine triphosphate. In the absence of oxygen some organisms use fermentation to manufacture ATP, compared to the aerobic respiration if oxygen was available to continue the next two stages of cellular respiration, the citric acid cycle and the electron transport chain within the mitochondria. There are two general mechanisms by which certain cells can oxidize fuel molecules and generate ATP in the absence of oxygen: fermentation and anaerobic
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fermentation Lab 4 respiration. The distinction between these two processes is that fermentation does not utilize an
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern