Blueflag_Peeling_back_Layers (3) - Peeling Back the Layers...

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Unformatted text preview: Peeling Back the Layers .. “Bluefiag” Grade Eight This activity will help you to understand how authors use sound devices, figurative language, imagery, contrast, and syntax to develop a certain tone or a certain theme in a poem. Directions 1. Read the poem ‘Blueflag’.’ by Elizabeth Brewster. 2. Paraphrase the poem. Explain, in prose, exactly what is happening in the poem. 3. Look at the sound devices in the poem. Highlight and label all the sound devices in the poem: alliteration, assonance, consonance, and rhyme. 4. Identify all the figures of speech in the poem. For lines that have a literal meaning (in other words, the line means exactly what it says: no more, no less), label with the word literal; In line: that have a figurative meaning, label personification, simile, or metaphor. 5. Look at the imagery in the poem. Write headings of the five senses. Go through the poem and write words or phrases that fit under those headings: touch, sight, taste, hearing, and smell. Afier you have identified the imagery in the poem, try to find a pattern or- strand of imagery. For example, the poem contains lots of different colors. Write out the colors and the lines that contain the color words. Be creative. Color images — blue, green, pink, white (“milk-thin daisies”), yellow (“sunVeined,” “butterblob”). Try to find at least two more patterns of imagery. 6. This poem is basically about two different, or contrasting, ideas. First, with a partner, look at the poem carefully and try to determine what two opposite ideas‘ are being presented in this poem. After you de'tennine the basic contrast in the poem, make a chart with your two headings being the two contrasting ideas you see. Fill in the chart with words or phrases fiom the poem. Your chart will look like this: 5 words or pleases that convey that idea words or phrases that convey that idea After compiling this list, complete this sentence, filling in the blanks with the appropriate answer: 186 Brewster contrasts with ‘ in this poem because she is trying to show the distinction between and 7. Look at the syntax, or sentence structure, of the poem. You will do this in several stages; :3. Identity all the complete sentences in the poem by drawing brackets. b. Highlight all the dependent clauses in the poem. Some dependent clauses are lacking the ' introducton word or another word. For instance, “as soap” (line 11) is really a dependent clause if you add the word “is.” c. Highlight and label all the phrases: prepositional, gemnd, participial, infinitive, appositive. (1. Highlight and label the part of speech of all the words used inunusual ways. Poets ofien express their creativity by coining new words; this is called “poetic license.” ' e. Circle examples of repetition and connect similar words or phrases with lines and arrows. ' 8. With a partner, determine the shift, or change, in this poem. You should be able to find the exact line where the poem is moving in one direction and then abruptly changes direction. After you determine the shift, write out what. is happening in the poem before and after the shift and the word(s) that signals a shift i 9. Determine the tone of the poem, or the speaker’s (or author’s) attitude toward the subject. Does the tone change after the shifi? Determine the tone by writing out the words in the poem with positive connotations and those with negative cermotations. Then, in a complete sentence, write out the tone of the poem. 10. Determine several themes of the poem. A theme in literature is a truth about human behavior or motivation. Theme should be expressed in a complete declarative sentence. Thus, “childhood fears” is not a suitable theme; neither is ‘,‘Do we ever recover hem the fears our parents instill in us?” Write out two or three one—sentence themes that express a universal truth. 187 ...
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