micro chapter1 2015 - The Microbial World and You Chapter 1...

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The Microbial World and You Chapter 1
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What are some terms and concepts that come to mind when someone says “Microbiology” ? Bacteria Virus Germs Disease Infection Small organisms Pain
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Advertisements tell you that bacteria and viruses are all over your home and that you need to buy antibacterial cleaning products. Should you? Question: Answer: at the end of lecture
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What is a microorganism? Microorganism : A microorganism is any minute Living thing that is too small to be seen with the unaided eye. Germ refers to a rapidly growing cell
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Microbes in Our Lives Question: What are ways in which microbes affect our daily lives ?
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Microbes in Our Lives A few are pathogenic (disease-causing) Decompose organic waste Are producers in the ecosystem by photosynthesis Produce industrial chemicals such as ethanol(beer) and acetone Produce fermented foods such as vinegar, cheese, and bread Produce products used in manufacturing (e.g., cellulase)(breaks down cellulose) and
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Microbes in Our Lives Knowledge of microorganisms Allows humans to Prevent food spoilage Prevent disease occurrence Led to aseptic techniques to prevent contamination in medicine and in microbiology laboratories
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Applications of Microbiology, p. 3 Designer Jeans: Made by Microbes? Stone-washing: Trichoderma Cotton: Gluconacetobacter Debleaching: Mushroom peroxidase Indigo: E. coli Plastic: Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate
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The system of naming organisms was established in 1735 by Carlous Linnaeus. Each organism has two names: Genus name species name Scientific names describe organisms, honors a researcher or identifies a habitat. Naming Microorganisms
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The system we use today to classify microorganisms was developed in 1978 by Carl Woese Organisms are classified according to cellular organization into Domains Bacteria Archaea Eukarya Classifying Microorganisms
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Naming and Classifying Microorganisms Bacteria and Archaea are prokaryotes Eukarya are eukaryotes Within the Domain Eukarya are four kingdoms Protists Fungi : yeasts molds. Plants Animals
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Types of Microorganisms Bacteria Archaea Fungi Protozoa Algae Viruses Multicellular animal parasites
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Archaea Prokaryotic Lack peptidoglycan Live in extreme environments Include Methanogens Extreme halophiles Extreme thermophiles not on 1 st test
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Bacteria Prokaryotes Peptidoglycan cell walls (seperates them from archae) Binary fission For energy, use organic chemicals, inorganic chemicals, or photosynthesis
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Fungi Eukaryotes Chitin cell walls Use organic chemicals for energy Molds and mushrooms are multicellular, consisting of masses of mycelia, which are composed of filaments called hyphae Yeasts are unicellular
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