The First Amendment in the American History

The First Amendment in the American History - Surname1 Name...

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Surname1 Name Institution Lecturer Datesss The First Amendment in the American History. There exists no other idea that is more fundamental and essential to Americans’ sense of themselves as individuals and as a country, than that of freedom. The focal term in the American vocabulary, freedom or liberty which in most cases is almost used interchangeably is embedded deeply in the American history books and the language we use in our everyday life. As one author from the Columbia University states, the declaration of liberty lists liberty among mankind's inalienable rights; the constitution announces securing liberty's blessings as its purpose [Fon04] . According to him, freedom has always been implemented with the intention of mobilizing support for war, for instance, the United States of America fought the Civil War with the intention of bringing a new face of freedom and liberty. The Americans also took part in the second World War and the Cold War with the aim of securing the “Four Freedoms” and the Free World” respectively [Bur02] . The love for freedom by the Americans has often been represented by various things including; poles, states and caps, while it has also been portrayed by draft cards and burning stamps, demonstrating with the aim of obtaining the right to vote and fleeing away from slave owners or masters. It is obvious that everyone around the world loves and cherish freedom, however the idea seems to be mostly rooted and more prominent in the private and public sector of the United States compared to any other country [ush17] . As one statesman and educator, Ralph Bunche, wrote, “Every man in the streets, whether white, black, red or yellow, knows that this is the land of the free and the cradle of liberty.” (Bunche 1940). The First Amendment in the American history presents the issue of freedom or rather liberty that is worth exploring into how it was expressed, supported of curtailed from the time of its drafting (1865) to date.
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Surname2 One might argue that perhaps it is because of its ubiquity that freedom has never been considered as a concept or rather, a fixed category. It is accurate to say that the history of American freedom has been and somehow still is a tale of many disagreements, debates and struggles rather an evolutionary narrative being worked on to achieve a preordained goal[Lec95]. The meaning of liberty has also been developed at all societal levels, not only in political treaties and congressional debates, rather on the grass roots, i.e. to the common American man. The amendment states that "Congress shall make no law...abridging the
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