unit4 - Unit 4 SLAVERY IN AMERICAN CHAPTER 1 THE BLACK MANS...

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Unit 4 SLAVERY IN AMERICAN CHAPTER 1 THE BLACK MAN ʹ S AFRICAN PAST .......................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2 THE SLAVE TRADE ......................................................................................................................... 5 CHAPTER 3 SOLOMON NORTHUP AND MAMMY HARRIET ................................................................. 10 CHAPTER 4 THE LIFE CYCLE OF A SLAVE .................................................................................................... 14 CHAPTER 5 METHODS OF CONTROLLING SLAVES ................................................................................ 18 CHAPTER 6 RESPONSES TO SLAVERY: SPIRITUALS AND STORIES .................................................. 22 CHAPTER 7 THREE RESPONSES TO SLAVERY: JOSIAH HENSON, FREDERICK DOUGLASS AND SOJOURNER TRUTH ............................................................................................................................................ 26 CHAPTER 8 RESPONSES TO SLAVERY: NAT TURNER’S REBELLION .................................................. 31 CHAPTER 9 COMPENSATION FOR SLAVERY .............................................................................................. 35 by Thomas Ladenburg, copyright, 1974, 1998, 2001, 2007 100 Brantwood Road, Arlington, MA 02476 781-646-4577 [email protected]
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Page 1 Thomas Ladenburg, copyright, 1974, 1998, 2001, 2007 [email protected] Chapter 1 The Black Man's African Past A Black skin means membership in a race of men which has never created a civilization of any kind. — John Burgess, Scholar efore doing the reading, answer the following questions, true or false. (make a chart similar to the one below on your own paper.) Statement True/ False Still T/F 1. Most of Africa is jungle. 2. Africans usually were hunters. 3. Most Africans lived in primitive tribes. 4. There were few if any cities in Africa 400 years ago. 5. The Africans did not use money 400 years ago. 6. Most Africans believed in “witch gods” 400 years ago. 7. There was no slavery in Africa. 8. 400 years ago, Africans did not have a written language. 9. White people brought civilization to Africa. 10. Religion was very important to Africans. Now read the story of Gustavus Vassa and the excerpts from the History textbook. Then decide if the statement is still true — and if it isn't write a true statement based on the new information you just learned. Rewrite the original statement if it was false, even if you did not agree with it. Gustavus Vassa Gustavus Vassa was born in Benin in West Africa. He was the youngest son of a chief. At age II, Gustavus was captured by slave traders and was taken hundreds of miles from his home. When he arrived on the coast, he was sold to white men who put him on a slave ship. He was taken to America and sold several times. Up to this point, Vase's story is much like that of about 10,000,000 Africans, except that Vassa survived the living hell of the slave ship. After that, his story is very unusual. Gustavus was taught to read and write and later was able to earn enough money to buy his own freedom. With the help of friends in England, he was able to find someone to publish his story. Parts of his book are printed below: Vassa's Africa The kingdom of Benin is divided into many districts. I was born in one of the villages furthest from the capital. The distance from the capital and sea coast must nave been great. I had never heard of white men, the sea, or Europe, before I was captured. B
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Page 2 Thomas Ladenburg, copyright, 1974, 1998, 2001, 2007 [email protected] My people had little to do with the King of Benin. As far as I could tell, all of the government was run by chiefs or elders of my village. What happens in one village and family is pretty typical for the whole nation. Let me tell you of my life in Africa.
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