History HL Internal Assessment

History HL Internal Assessment - History HL Internal...

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History HL Internal Assessment D’Shealyn Bullock Suitland High School Word Count: 1,635 How beneficial were dogs as messengers in World War I?
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Section A: Plan of the investigation The question that will be investigated: How beneficial were dogs as messengers in World War I? The research includes information on how dogs were either beneficial or non-beneficial messengers during World War I. World War I was from years 1914 – 1918 so the details given will be from those years. The research gathered will help with compare and contrasting the benefits and non-benefits during World War I also information leading up to dogs being involved. The information will be gathered from articles and the Internet on the use of dogs in World War I. Information about the topic will also be found in history books based on what dogs did during World War I to either benefit or not benefit messages sent back and forth for American and French soldiers. With sources and evidence, the conclusion will be produced. Section B: A summary of evidence War Dogs History -Corinthians used dogs versus the Greeks -Romans used dogs for protection, alarms, and guard legions -Germany had 30,000 dogs -Britain, France, Italy had over 20,000 dogs each -Italy had 3,000 dogs -Adolf Hitler owned a dog in German trenches -Sergeant Stubby -Hero Satan (Three legged dog who saved lives) -Doberman pinscher’s and German Shepherds for strength, trainability, intelligence -Dog training school in Scotland – 4,000 meters on Western Front -“The fame of the war dogs may well rest on the splendid work they actually did; it needs no support from the stories of what some of sentimentalists would like to believe they did.” by Ernest Harold Baynes American and French Method Not Involving Dogs - Soldiers sent to deliver messages but killed on the way - Soldiers as guards but did not listen or catch enough enemies
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-Soldiers had hard time communicating in long distances when other sources (telegraphs, birds) were not available American and French Method Involving Dogs -1919: tens of thousands messenger dogs from French and American soldiers were released -1916 Battle of Verdun, French soldiers boxed in German forces while telephone and telegraph lines were down. -No pigeons were around -7 men killed trying to deliver messages -Used dogs to utilize a few 100 from allies for specific missions Usage of Dogs (Pros) -pet of General -Mascot -Stray-made-companion of an obliging soldier -dogs can leap over an allied trench -well-suited to navigate obstacles of trench warfare -trained to maneuver
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