CAMS1103 - Syllabus Summer 2017

CAMS1103 - Syllabus Summer 2017 - CAMS 1103 Classical...

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Unformatted text preview: CAMS 1103 Classical Mythology Three credit online course University of Connecticut May 2017 Quick start: If you have time on your hands, and want to get a jump on activities for the course before HuskyCT opens at midnight on the first day, doing the reading in advance, as specified below on this syllabus, is highly recommended. At the end of this syllabus, you will also find l inks to the video lectures of the introduction and the first module . Instructor: Roger Travis, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Classics Department of Modern and Classical Languages University of Connecticut Office hours: Online, via video or text chat, by appointment. Please email to let me know you wish to chat live via Google Hangout, Skype, or phone. What’s in this syllabus Welcome to CAMS 1103, a course in some of the greatest stories ever told. What you’ll find in this syllabus is a summary of the goals of the course, a list of course materials, an overview of course policies, and a schedule of modules, each one with a precis of each unit’s activities. You’ll find the modules elsewhere here on the course website, and the links in the modules will guide you through the required activities, along with the assignments you will be completing as the course requirements. PLEASE NOTE: This course is a course in classical mythology, but it involves a substantial amount of study of modern culture as well. You may have to do a few hours of extra work to expand your knowledge of modern culture in order to participate fully in discussion. This work may involve reading about modern subjects like Kim Kardashian and Superman on Wikipedia; it may also involve watching films like A merican Pie , although reading articles on Wikipedia is always an acceptable and time­saving substitute for viewing films and TV shows. Think carefully, though: if you're not ready to have whatever ideas about ancient myth you've come to this course with challenged and even changed by encounters with films like S tar Wars , artists like Mel Brooks, and games like H alo , please consider finding another course. Goals, Objectives, Assessments A. Goal: Knowledge of the stories of classical myth Objective: Students will be able to summarize the key stories of classical mythology. Assessment: quiz questions B. Goal: Knowledge of key interpretations of classical myth Objective: Students will be able to summarize what the interpreters of classical myths have theorized about those myths’ relation to the rest of classical culture. Assessment: quiz questions C. Goal: Skill at analysis of myth Objective: Students will be able to produce a basic analysis of a myth from any culture, including their own, which relates the myth to cultural truth­value. Assessment: “Lab reports,” mythomachies D. Goal: Knowledge of the reception of the classical myths Objective: Students will be able to recognize the presence of the key stories of classical myth in works originating throughout the history of Western culture, from the archaic period of Greece to modern America Assessment: mythomachies E. Goal: Applied analysis of modern culture Outcome: Students will be able to describe thickly their own culture as a reawakening of ancient mythic practice. Assessment: “Lab report,” mythomachies Required Course Materials Open­source texts Homer (trans. Butler) O dyssey (online open­source) Ovid (trans. Moore) M etamorphoses (online open­source) Selections from Classical mythological literature (online open­source) Wikipedia articles linked in reading Googledocs NOTE: R eading the linked Wikipedia articles, which provide essential context for the primary source readings, is a required activity of the course: your grasp of these articles' content will be assessed both on quizzes as you answer direct questions concerning what you read and in discussion and lab reports as you actively bring the content to bear on those activities. All the above texts will be linked in the learning modules on HuskyCT. Forum Access You will be required to participate in forum discussions on HuskyCT as part of this course. Links to the specific discussions will be provided within each module. The required discussions in this course take a unique form called "mythomachy"; see the separate "Rules for Mythomachy" in the introductory module for details. Course Policies This course requires a great deal of work. If you’re taking it because you think an online course can’t be hard, I urge you to reconsider. As you’ll see from the schedule of modules, you will have lectures to watch, reading to do, written “lab reports” to turn in, and discussions to participate in faithfully. You will also be quizzed on your learning of the material in the reading. The written assignments themselves are not especially time­consuming, but to complete them on­time and successfully, and thus pass the course, you will have to do the watching and reading assignments, which are much more time­consuming activities. Assignments must be submitted on time, except in case of documented emergency. This policy includes the required mythomachy discussions: posts in the discussion forums will not count toward your grade if made after the date when the discussion closes, which is the last day of the module. If you foresee a conflict, please inform me of it as soon as possible. In the absence of a documented emergency, your work will be graded down one full grade per day of belatedness. Quizzes are available at any time until 11:59pm on the final day of classes. Unlimited attempts at quizzes are allowed; only your highest attempt counts. If you can document an emergency that has prevented you from taking a quiz, you may be excused from it, and it will not factor into your course­grade. Computer problems by themselves do not constitute a documentable emergency unless you can provide evidence, for example from the HuskyCT support team, that you made a diligent effort to take the quiz during its availability but were prevented by computer issues. Reports may be turned in late, with a ten point penalty per day of lateness. Grading for the course is as follows: discussion assignments (called "mythomachy"­­see separate instructions) (7) at, 5.71% each; lab reports (7) at 5.71% each; quizzes (7) 2.85% each. Grades are assigned thus: >92=A, >89=A­, >86=B+, >82=B, >79=B­, >76=C+, >72=C, >69=C­, >66=D+, >62=D, >59=D­, <=59=F. This is an online asynchronous course. That means that you may choose your own schedule for completing course activities on a short­term basis­­that is, in a 24­hour period, you get to choose when to work on the course. It does not mean that you can go long periods between sessions of working on the course. Most importantly, this course thrives on discussion, and discussion requires constant attention. If you want to perform well in this course, you should at a minimum post every 48 hours in your team­forum, and post at least five times, at least three of them in response to the posts of others, for each module. All these things (posting every 72 hours, posting five times per module, and posting at least three times in reply) are recommended for a good score. Scores for discussion are capped at 70 (=C­) for students who wait until the last 24 hours of a module to post. Please be sure you understand and follow university standards for academic conduct, especially where they relate to plagiarism. The SafeAssign system used for the reports in this course has made it very easy to detect improper use of sources, and plagiarism is a much more serious matters than most students tend to realize before reviewing university standards. Should you be found to have turned in work that is not entirely your own, without proper attribution of your sources, it is my responsibility to impose a penalty. For the first offense, you will receive a zero on the work submitted. For a second offense, you will receive an F for the course. In accordance with the student handbook, you may, if found to have committed academic misconduct, request a hearing within five days. Schedule of Modules (f or a granular schedule, with dates, click here ) Days 1­2 Module 1, What is Classical Myth? ● ● Watch : Video lectures: Introduction, The O dyssey and the a ndra , Succession, Troy Read : O dyssey books 1­4, Selected texts document 1; Wikipedia articles on S tar Wars and T he Lord of the Rings (if you are unfamiliar with these important works of modern culture) ● ● Take: Quiz 1 Discuss: Come up with a team name. Discuss your team's response to the mythomachy question in your team­forum, and make sure one of you posts your responses on both sides. ● Write : 500­750 word report on an experience of a modern myth like a movie, a pop song, or a video game, and its relation to the material of Module 1. Days 3­4 Module 2, The andra and the war ● ● ● ● Watch : Video lectures: Calypso; Odysseus and Demodocus. Video Supplements: Hermes, Poseidon. Read : O dyssey books 5­8, Selected texts document 2; Notes on Hermes, Notes on Poseidon. Take: Quiz 2 Discuss: Discuss your team's response to the mythomachy question in your team­forum, and make sure one of you posts your responses on both sides. ● Write : 500­750 word report on an experience of a modern myth like a movie, a pop song, or a video game, and its relation to the material of Module 2. Days 5­6 Module 3, K leos and n ostos : the balancing act ● ● Watch : Video lecture: The n ostos problem; video supplements: Jason, Afterlife. Read : O dyssey books 9­12, Selected texts document 3; Notes on Jason, Medea, and the Argonauts; Notes on Afterlife Myth; Notes on the Curse Myths of Mycenae and Thebes; Wikipedia articles on Marilyn Monroe and Mother Teresa (if you are unfamiliar with these important modern mythmakers). ● Take: Quiz 3 ● Discuss: Discuss your team's response to the mythomachy question in your team­forum, and make sure one of you posts your responses on both sides. ● Write : 500­750 word report on an experience of a modern myth like a movie, a pop song, or a video game, and its relation to the material of Module 3. Days 7­8 Module 4, Odysseus, (anti)hero of m etis ● Watch : Video lectures: Focus on Penelope, The end of the O dyssey : three symbols; video supplements: Athena, Artemis, Aphrodite ● Read : O dyssey books 13­24, Selected texts document 4; Notes on Athena, Notes on Artemis, Notes on Aphrodite; Wikipedia articles on A merican Pie and A merican Beauty (if you are unfamiliar with these important works of modern culture). ● ● Take: Quiz 4 Discuss: Discuss your team's response to the mythomachy question in your team­forum, and make sure one of you posts your responses on both sides. ● Write : 500­750 word report on an experience of a modern myth like a movie, a pop song, or a video game, and its relation to the material of Module 4. Days 9­10 Module 5, Who was Ovid and why did he destroy mythology? ● ● Watch : Video lecture: Introduction to Ovid Read : M etamorphoses books 1­4, Selected texts document 5; Notes on Apollo, Notes on Dionysus; Wikipedia articles on Mel Brooks and Stephen Colbert (if you are unfamiliar with these important modern mythmakers). ● ● Take: Quiz 5 Discuss: Discuss your team's response to the mythomachy question in your team­forum, and make sure one of you posts your responses on both sides. ● Write : 500­750 word report on an experience of a modern myth like a movie, a pop song, or a video game, and its relation to the material of Module 5. Days 11­12 Module 6, Who is Mythic Guy and why isn’t he a hero? ● ● Watch : Video lectures: Ovid and Mythic Guy (example: Perseus) Read : M etamorphoses books 5­8, Selected texts document 6; Notes on Mythic Guy, Notes on Demeter; Notes on Athenian Myth; Wikipedia articles on Superman and Batman (if you are unfamiliar with these important modern myths). ● ● Take: Quiz 6 Discuss: Discuss your team's response to the mythomachy question in your team­forum, and make sure one of you posts your responses on both sides. ● Write : 500­750 word report on an experience of a modern myth like a movie, a pop song, or a video game, and its relation to the material of Module 6. Days 13­14 Module 7 What is Ovid doing to humanism? Why is Rome such a bad place? ● ● Watch : Video lectures: Ovid and Love, Ovid and Rome Read : M etamorphoses books 9­15, Selected texts document 7; Notes on Heracles; Notes on Orpheus; Notes on the Aeneid; Notes on Roman Myth. ● ● Take: Quiz 7 Discuss: Discuss your team's response to the mythomachy question in your team­forum, and make sure one of you posts your responses on both sides. ● Write : 500­750 word report on an experience of a modern myth like a movie, a pop song, or a video game, and its relation to the material of Module 7. Links to video lectures of introduction and first module: Lecture 1­­Introduction to Classical Mythology: A: h ttp:// B: h ttp:// C: h ttp:// Lecture 2­­The Odssey and the Andra: A: h ttp:// B: h ttp:// C: h ttp:// D: h ttp:// Lecture 3­­Creation and Succession: A: h ttp:// B: h ttp:// C: h ttp:// D: h ttp:// Lecture 4­­Troy A: h ttp:// B: h ttp:// ­uCi2Q&feature=player_embedded C: h ttp:// D: h ttp:// E: h ttp:// F: h ttp:// “Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment and Inappropriate Romantic Relationships The University is committed to maintaining an environment free of discrimination or discriminatory harassment directed toward any person or group within its community – students, employees, or visitors. Academic and professional excellence can flourish only when each member of our community is assured an atmosphere of mutual respect. All members of the University community are responsible for the maintenance of an academic and work environment in which people are free to learn and work without fear of discrimination or discriminatory harassment. In addition, inappropriate Romantic relationships can undermine the University’s mission when those in positions of authority abuse or appear to abuse their authority. To that end, and in accordance with federal and state law, the University prohibits discrimination and discriminatory harassment, as well as inappropriate Romantic relationships, and such behavior will be met with appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from the University. More information is available at . Sexual Assault Reporting Policy To protect the campus community, all non­confidential University employees (including faculty) are required to report assaults they witness or are told about to the Office of Diversity & Equity under the Sexual Assault Response Policy. 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  • Spring '14
  • video   game, Selected   texts   document, Wikipedia   articles, pop   song, word   report, mythomachy   question

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