Essay 4 - Wilkes 1 POSITION PAPER 2 Kaylee Wilkes HIS3239...

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Wilkes 1 POSITION PAPER 2 Kaylee Wilkes HIS3239 Dr.Watkins 3/18/2017
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Wilkes 2 Christianity since its very origins has been a diverse and variegated religious movement. By the end of the fifth century, however, the Christian community within the Roman Empire experienced a unique level of uniformity not the least part thanks to the influence of the Roman State and its ability to create uniformity (or at least something close to uniformity) through force. "Christendom" had emerged. By the end of the sixteenth century, "Christendom" was no more. Not only were there many different political bodies throughout the Mediterranean basin, but these political States adopted different forms of Christianity, forms that often came into violent and devastating conflict with each other. Why did the "unified Christendom" of the end of the fifth century fall apart in the sixteenth century (or, in other words, what brought about the Reformation and the confessional conflicts of the sixteenth century)? Things that you might want to consider: reform movements in the Church, new institutions in the Church (e.g. new monastic orders, universities, etc.), the rise of the papacy, the relationship between the Church and State in Europe, theology and theological developments from the fifth century onward, cultural transformations both inside and outside of the Church (e.g. the printing press). 1. Introduction a. Thesis i. Focus on papal authority and reforms within the church, maybe new church institutions ii. Add in counter argument iii. Due to the rise of the papacy, and the corruption of the popes, the idea of a “unified Christendom” began to fall. Although there are other contributing factors, such 2. Sources a. William C. Placher, “The Catholic Reformation,” in RHCT2, p. 38 b. William C. Placher, “Calvin and the English Reformation,” in RHCT2, pp. 58-59 c. John Calvin, “Selections from Institutes the Christian Religion,” in RHCT2, pp. 59-66 d. e. Nicetas Choniates, “Account of the Sack of Constantinople, 1204,” f. Steven Ozment, Protestants, chapters 5-6 (pp. 89-148) g. Richard Hooker, “Selections from The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity,” in RHCT2, pp. 72-75 h. Steven Ozment, Protestants, chapters 7-8 (pp. 151-192) i. schism powerpoints j. the catholic reformation part 1`
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