Key Facts About Those Uninusred

Key Facts About Those Uninusred - Key Facts about the...

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Key Facts about the Uninsured Population Sep 29, 2016 Decreasing the number of uninsured is a key goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which extends Medicaid coverage to many low-income individuals in states that have expanded and provides Marketplace subsidies for individuals below 400% of poverty. The ACA’s major coverage provisions went into effect in January 2014 and have led to significant coverage gains As of the end of 2015, the number of uninsured nonelderly Americans stood at 28.5 million, a decrease of nearly 13 million since 2013. This fact sheet describes how coverage has changed under the ACA, examines the characteristics of the uninsured population, and summarizes the access and financial implications of not having coverage. Page 1 of 20 Key Facts about the Uninsured Population | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation 3/30/2017
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How has the number of uninsured changed under the ACA? Summary: Key Facts about the Uninsured Population How has the number of uninsured changed under the ACA? In the past, gaps in the public insurance system and lack of access to affordable private coverage left millions without health insurance. Beginning in 2014, the ACA expanded coverage to millions of previously uninsured people through the expansion of Medicaid and the establishment of Health Insurance Marketplaces. Data show substantial gains in public and private insurance coverage and historic decreases in uninsured rates in the first and second years of ACA coverage. Coverage gains were particularly large among low-income people living in states that expanded Medicaid. Still, millions of people—28.5 million in 2015— remain without coverage. Why do people remain uninsured? Even under the ACA, many uninsured people cite the high cost of insurance as the main reason they lack coverage. In 2015, 46% of uninsured adults said that they tried to get coverage but did not because it was too expensive. Many people do not have access to coverage through a job, and some people, particularly poor adults in states that did not expand Medicaid, remain ineligible for financial assistance for coverage. Some people who are eligible for financial assistance under the ACA may not know they can get help, and others may still find the cost of coverage prohibitive. In addition, undocumented immigrants are ineligible for Medicaid or Marketplace coverage. Who remains uninsured? Most uninsured people are in low-income families and have at least one worker in the family. Reflecting the more limited availability of public coverage in some states, adults are more likely to be uninsured than children. People of color are at higher risk of being uninsured than non-Hispanic Whites. How does the lack of insurance affect access to health care?
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