Protocol - Seasonal Sunlight intensity and its affects on...

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Unformatted text preview: Seasonal Sunlight intensity and its affects on tree growth at Hawk Mountain Stephanie Afflerbach Biology 220W March 4, 2008 Abstract: The point of this experiment is to show whether or not the group hypothesis is supported or negated. This is shown through previous research done by other ecologists whom had done an experiment similar to what this is based off of; how the northern side of a slope of a mountain is comparative to the southern side of mountain in terms of the affect of sunlight intensity. In order to complete the experiment we sectioned off a 5m radius of a circle and then found the diameter of a max of three trees per five plots on both slopes. Then we calculated how many trees were within each plot on both sides and also determined the average diameter of each plot and graphed it to compare with the sunlight intensity taken for three days. From there it’s basically interpreting the data that was collected to see if the hypothesis was partially or fully supported or negated. Introduction: Due to previous research it has been shown that larger trees are known for that shade intensity would be denser with a larger diameter compare to a smaller diameter that could have had been exposed to mineral soil or disturbance (Naumburg 205-215). Gustafson has shown that tree growth can be affected by how much sunlight that is being produced affects the trees, such as younger trees taking in ¾ of full sunlight (212-...
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Protocol - Seasonal Sunlight intensity and its affects on...

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